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KevinBrowning
July 10th, 2004, 10:11 PM
This is the official thread in which we will nominate books to be voted on for the next book our club will read and discuss. For a book to be considered a nominee, it must be nominated by at least two members. Please don't nominate more than one book. You can change your mind, but please be clear as to which book you decide on nominating. After we have at least three books nominated (two if not enough people participate), we will hold a vote to choose our next book from the nominees. We have already discussed 1984 by George Orwell. Other than that, you can nominate any book you want. The faster we get the nomination and voting done with, the faster we can start reading and discussing. Let the nominations begin.

Edit: Please include the author of the book, so there are no misunderstandings. Thanks.

KneeLess
July 11th, 2004, 08:24 AM
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

chadn737
July 11th, 2004, 11:22 AM
Dune

KevinBrowning
July 11th, 2004, 05:02 PM
So far there are NO nominees. At least two people need to agree on a book before it can be a nominee. Please respond soon, everyone.

tinkerbell
July 11th, 2004, 06:55 PM
I'm going on a limb here...A Fine Balance

tinkerbell
July 11th, 2004, 06:57 PM
Book Description A Fine Balance
With a compassionate realism and narrative sweep that recall the work of Charles Dickens, this magnificent novel captures all the cruelty and corruption, dignity and heroism, of India. The time is 1975. The place is an unnamed city by the sea. The government has just declared a State of Emergency, in whose upheavals four strangers--a spirited widow, a young student uprooted from his idyllic hill station, and two tailors who have fled the caste violence of their native village--will be thrust together, forced to share one cramped apartment and an uncertain future.
As the characters move from distrust to friendship and from friendship to love, A Fine Balance creates an enduring panorama of the human spirit in an inhuman state.

HappyLady
July 11th, 2004, 07:01 PM
I will second the nomination for The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger.

My reasons are that it is a relatively short book, so it will keep momentum going in the book club. Secondly, it is a classic that anyone can benefit in some way from reading. Thirdly, I think it reaches a broad audience. It is not too complicated in theory and is quite easy reading. Yet, it isn't so simple that it can't make for LOTS of juicy debating.

tinkerbell
July 11th, 2004, 07:10 PM
FINE>.It is a great book...One of my favorites

HappyLady
July 11th, 2004, 07:39 PM
FINE>.It is a great book...One of my favorites

:lol:

Tink...ya know I love ya! But when I saw "Charles Dickens" in your suggestion, that was enough to make me want to take a nap. I read so much Dickens in college that even the thought of reading anything Dickens-like, would be like torture for me.

But hey...if someone seconds your vote, and it wins...I'll suffer through it...for you Tink...I will! *..* (Hey...I kinda like that Huggy Bear!)

KevinBrowning
July 11th, 2004, 09:36 PM
I will second Frank Herbert's classic sci-fi novel, Dune. I started it once, but never finished. So far the only nominees are it and J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, which I've also been wanting to read for quite some time. It would be great if we could get one more nominee, but if not, we'll start the vote in the next day or two. Thanks for your patience, everyone.

Demosthenes
July 12th, 2004, 12:39 PM
Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game.

Fyshhed
July 12th, 2004, 12:53 PM
Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game.
Second Ender's game and Dune, and suggest Ender's Shadow to accompany Ender's game if that's chosen.

KneeLess
July 12th, 2004, 02:01 PM
I don't think you can second two books...

Fyshhed
July 12th, 2004, 02:11 PM
I don't think you can second two books...
If I have to pick...
*hasn't read much of dune...*
*has read game and shadow...*
... ;?
*taking into account that others likely have not read and will be discussing....*
*...*
Ender's game & shadow!

FruitandNut
July 12th, 2004, 05:26 PM
They are all good reads, but as it was a brilliant essay on a voyage into manhood (al la 'rite of passage'), my one and ONLY vote will go to 'The Catcher in the Rye' by J.D. Salinger. I have a Penguin 'first edition' paperback copy, well thumbed in the past, it has languished among the book shelves for long enough. Let us give it another airing.

ps. If 'The Red Badge of Courage' or 'Catch 22' were to become a favourite, I wouldn't shed a tear over the choice.

pps. If you wanted a powerful multi-layered journey through the 'mystique de merde' of the seven deadly sins, then I would thoroughly recommend David Hughes 'The Pork Butcher' (1984 W.H.Smith Literary Award winner). I have the author's address and 'phone number and in the course of two 'phone calls and a letter from him, gained some fascinating insights into how the book came about. Hollywood took the film rights and diluted it into a mediocre PC presentation called 'Souvenir'. When I asked David Hughes how he felt about it, he replied, "When I feel bad about it, I just look at my bank balance."

Fyshhed
July 12th, 2004, 05:29 PM
They are all good reads, but as it was a brilliant essay on a voyage into manhood (al la 'rite of passage'), my one and ONLY vote will go to 'The Catcher in the Rye' by J.D. Salinger. I have a Penguin 'first edition' paperback copy, well thumbed in the past, it has languished among the book shelves for long enough. Let us give it another airing.

ps. If 'The Red Badge of Courage' or 'Catch 22' were to become a favourite, I wouldn't shed a tear over the choice.

I read Catcher in the Rye sophomore year. It was decent, but I would not say it was fantastic. We had some debates over it in class (a couple kids actually thought Holden was gay!) but we didn't linger on it too much. I might have a copy kicking around, but perhaps not.

FruitandNut
July 12th, 2004, 05:56 PM
Was Holden 'actually' gay, or was he going through a phase of 'orientation' that I noticed a significant minority of my peer group went through during their teenage years? Had Salinger experienced such a mix of feelings in his own adolescence?

Hey, we are in danger of having a premature extrapolation.

tinkerbell
July 12th, 2004, 07:59 PM
:lol:

Tink...ya know I love ya! But when I saw "Charles Dickens" in your suggestion, that was enough to make me want to take a nap. I read so much Dickens in college that even the thought of reading anything Dickens-like, would be like torture for me.

Are you nuts...Besides the man was my great great great (more or less) Uncle!

I love his books and read them over and over again..

KevinBrowning
July 12th, 2004, 09:34 PM
Alright, we have the minimum of three nominees. If the members are satisfied, we will vote tomorrow from the choices of Frank Herbert's Dune, J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye, and Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game. Thanks for the input, everyone. I'd like to quickly remind everyone that you're technically supposed to go into User CP and join the Book Club to participate in nomination and voting, although I'm not strictly enforcing that for the purpose of timeliness in getting started. The following people haven't yet joined: HappyLady, Demosthenes, and Fyshhed.

FruitandNut
July 14th, 2004, 05:08 AM
Are you nuts...Besides the man was my great great great (more or less) Uncle!

I love his books and read them over and over again..


I 'did' Dickens during my Combined Studies degree, but preferred some of the more modern writers.

ps. tinks, do you think your great, great, great (more or less), uncle used the character of 'Pip' as his special surrogate?

KevinBrowning
July 14th, 2004, 10:52 AM
I 'did' Dickens during my Combined Studies degree, but preferred some of the more modern writers.

ps. tinks, do you think your great, great, great (more or less), uncle used the character of 'Pip' as his special surrogate?
I have not read much by Charles Dickens. I might have read A Christmas Carol, but I do not recall.