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KevinBrowning
August 26th, 2004, 08:42 AM
I read the first chapter last night on the website Bin provided. I learned several things about Hitler. First, I hadn't realized that his father's career, and coercions about Adolf's future career, were such an influence on him. Also, it's interesting what an influence the study of history, especially German-Austrian history, had on him. I'm still not clear on where the little town he mentions at the very beginning was located, and whether he was born there or just grew up there. I'm fairly certain he was born in Austria. Although he seems to adamantly consider himself a German, and have great hatred for the Austrian monarchy. At this time, when Hitler is first developing his extreme nationalistic beliefs, he loses both his father and mother. What long-term effects on him do you think these deaths and other notable events in this chapter had, and what influence on his later role as the Fuhrer?

FruitandNut
August 26th, 2004, 11:29 AM
I have looked into his formative years, his strict upbringing with his grandparents is also interesting. Look at his experiences in the WW1 trenches and his early associations. Look at the legends, agrarian mindset, 'The Ring Cycle legends','Ode to Joy', 'Pastoral', 'Beethoven's 5th', the love of the German countryside and peasant stock. The traditions of societies and organisations rooted to holidays in the country. The mixing of the German blood with the German soil. The commonality of language and culture. The Prussian influence through Bismark and Frederick the Great. The legends of the Teutonic Knights and the Crusades. The 'insult' of the Treaty of Versailles and the effects of hyperinflation. His attitude to the German experience of Weimar democracy. His conclusion that respect and security is only validated by military might. His searches for scapegoats. His suspicion of the intelligentia and the upper classes etc., etc.. He viewed all those who spoke the German language as their traditional language as rightfully German, as such he longed for reunification and thought it was a birthright. From these points came his ideas of Aryianism and that Jews and Communists were a threat to the purity of his often contradictory ideals.

Background research is a must to fully comprehend where his thoughts have come from.

Demosthenes
September 2nd, 2004, 02:50 PM
Sorry I didnt participate in this discussion, but I've been very busy this past week, so I had no time to read it. Because it seems all of you are far ahead of me, I'll just wait until the next book.

KneeLess
September 2nd, 2004, 09:37 PM
What long-term effects on him do you think these deaths and other notable events in this chapter had, and what influence on his later role as the Fuhrer?
Honestly, I think this made him a much more emotionless person.

Although he seems to adamantly consider himself a German, and have great hatred for the Austrian monarchy
I find this ironic.