PDA

View Full Version : Comparison of Religious Sects



Meng Bomin
November 26th, 2004, 01:55 PM
I don't think that we have yet looked closely at the specific sects of religions such as Christianity.

I often attend a United Church of Christ church. It is a pretty liberal denomination of Protestantism (which is a sect of Christianity for those of you who did not yet know that).

Montalban
November 26th, 2004, 03:38 PM
I don't think that we have yet looked closely at the specific sects of religions such as Christianity.

I often attend a United Church of Christ church. It is a pretty liberal denomination of Protestantism (which is a sect of Christianity for those of you who did not yet know that).

What exactly do you want to discuss?

Meng Bomin
November 26th, 2004, 03:50 PM
What exactly do you want to discuss? The traits of various denominations. Perhaps this should be off topic as it is not exactly a debate. For instance, what are the central tenets of Othodox Christianity vs. Catholicism?

Montalban
November 26th, 2004, 04:23 PM
The traits of various denominations. Perhaps this should be off topic as it is not exactly a debate. For instance, what are the central tenets of Othodox Christianity vs. Catholicism?

A belief in Orthodoxy is a belief in the Christianity as established by Jesus Christ... and that this form of belief is (in dogma) unchanged since the time of Pentecost. We believe in a number of things that Catholics have changed (and subsequently the Protestant churches have moved further apart from).

One is the way to Salvation, which is through 'theosis', the way of becoming 'like Christ'. For Catholics and Protestants both, salvation is a legalistic process, rather like the repaying of a debt. (Catholics believe the debt is paid throughout one's life, through penance etc, and Protestants believe in a one-off payment through a declaration of faith - or that the debt has been pre-paid by Christ).

Another and related matter is our understanding of God (the Trinity), being that there is a distinction between God's essence and His energies. St. Gregory Palamas stated "There are three realities in God, namely, substance, energy and a Trinity of divine hypostases. Sine it has been shown above that those deemed worthy of union with God so as to become one spirit with Him (even as the great Paul said "He who clings to the Lord is one spirit with Him.") are not united to God in substance, and since all theologians bear witness in their statements to the fact that God is imparticipable in substance and the hypostatic union happens to be predicated of the Word and God-man (Jesus) alone, it follows that those deemed worthy of union with God are united to God in energy and that the spirit whereby he who clings to God is one with God is called and indeed is the uncreated energy of the Spirit and not the substance of God... For God foretold through the prophet not "My spirit" but rather "Of My Spirit I will pour out upon those who believe"
(St Gregory Palamas "One Hundred and Fifty Chapters", reprinted in Carlton, C, "The Truth: What every Roman Catholic Should know about the Orthodox Church", p88)

We are active participants in this (2 Peter 1:14), we 'put on Christ' (Gal 3:27) and become a member of His Body (1 Cor 6:15).

KevinBrowning
November 27th, 2004, 10:43 AM
Montalban, if I am correct you have some knowledge of Islam. My understanding of the difference between Sunni and Shia is shallow. I only know that it arose from a difference regarding caliphate lineage after Muhammad, involving Ali and Abu Bakr. Could you explain in particular why this disagreement would cause such intrareligious hatred in the modern Middle East?

Montalban
November 27th, 2004, 02:15 PM
Montalban, if I am correct you have some knowledge of Islam. My understanding of the difference between Sunni and Shia is shallow. I only know that it arose from a difference regarding caliphate lineage after Muhammad, involving Ali and Abu Bakr. Could you explain in particular why this disagreement would cause such intrareligious hatred in the modern Middle East?

This would be me talking outside my depth. What I do know is what you've stated already, that one sect follows a series of Immans, the other does not.

Sorry, can't be of any help

KevinBrowning
November 27th, 2004, 05:15 PM
This would be me talking outside my depth. What I do know is what you've stated already, that one sect follows a series of Immans, the other does not.

Sorry, can't be of any help

No problem, I will just have to research it on my own. I just find it very strange that such a seemingly minor dogmatic difference could cause open warfare at various times between these two sects. I suppose, though, that it's more of a cultural and tribal tension than religious.

Montalban
November 27th, 2004, 05:18 PM
No problem, I will just have to research it on my own. I just find it very strange that such a seemingly minor dogmatic difference could cause open warfare at various times between these two sects. I suppose, though, that it's more of a cultural and tribal tension than religious.
Still as their faith is inspired by Satan, it is to be expected.

Fyshhed
November 28th, 2004, 11:16 AM
No problem, I will just have to research it on my own. I just find it very strange that such a seemingly minor dogmatic difference could cause open warfare at various times between these two sects. I suppose, though, that it's more of a cultural and tribal tension than religious.
*Cough cough*
Catholicism and Protestantism
*cough cough*

RTShatto
November 28th, 2004, 09:13 PM
*Cough cough*
Catholicism and Protestantism
*cough cough*
Its not "minor differences", if it was "minor" then there wouldnt be 30,000+ Protestant denomination and just a hand full of Catholic denominations