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View Full Version : Iraq - the future?



Mike
February 12th, 2005, 08:50 AM
While any number of things could happen in the next few years, where do you see the situation in Iraq going? Will it become a stable democracy and a stepping stone to a peacefull Middle East, or can you see an insurgent uprising perhaps leading to another dictatorship?

KevinBrowning
February 12th, 2005, 09:58 AM
I think that the majority of the Iraqi people truly want peace and democracy. Now that we have given them the foundation of liberation from Saddam Husayn and democratic elections, it is largely up to them where their future goes from here.

Snoop
February 12th, 2005, 12:22 PM
Dictatorships take time to develop - just like democracies. Might as well flip a coin at this point because anything can happen. It could become like Haiti.

vance101
February 12th, 2005, 12:32 PM
Right now Iraq is in a mess, but hopefully the insurgents will finaly be cleared out, and the dust and rubble can be clearned out, they alredy know there loseing, the insurgents just want attention and power, and they are loseing that every day

Iluvatar
February 12th, 2005, 12:46 PM
What I wonder is what we'll do if we leave and insurgents take over. Let's say that a few years down the road, after we've pulled out, a decent sized faction tries to take over Iraq, and has a handy chunk of the popular support. We end up with a civill war going on in Iraq. Would we be obligated to help?

vance101
February 12th, 2005, 10:37 PM
Lol once they take over the oil fields, then we will be "obligated" to help =)
or once they get explosives that can reach iran. Oh Boy, France would have a FIELD day if we let that happen...

FruitandNut
February 13th, 2005, 12:48 AM
What I wonder is what we'll do if we leave and insurgents take over. Let's say that a few years down the road, after we've pulled out, a decent sized faction tries to take over Iraq, and has a handy chunk of the popular support. We end up with a civill war going on in Iraq. Would we be obligated to help?

In the next few years it is very possible that the west will have alternative fuel technology coming on stream. So long as America can keep motoring and using central heating and air conditioning, the 'Arabs' may be left to tend their camels and goats and pitch their tents among the crumbling concrete canyons that were once downtown Basra, Kirkuk or Ryhaid. In the meantime I feel that lessons may be learned and a more consentual and honest approach sought.

KevinBrowning
February 13th, 2005, 10:25 AM
The scenario that cannot be allowed is division of the country into two or more nations, divided by sect and ethnicity. The Kurds, Shias and Sunnis must learn to work together and overlook their differences. This is the key of democracy: heeding the will of the majority, without trampling the rights of the minority (the Sunnis). This will be a bitter pill for them since they have been in charge for so long, but it isn't right for 20% of the population to have absolute control, a la the Baath Party.

Mike
February 13th, 2005, 10:41 AM
What I wonder is what we'll do if we leave and insurgents take over. Let's say that a few years down the road, after we've pulled out, a decent sized faction tries to take over Iraq, and has a handy chunk of the popular support. We end up with a civill war going on in Iraq. Would we be obligated to help?

I guess that might highlight the real reason we went there in the first place. If it was simply to find WMDs then our leaders would be reluctant to return. If it was simply to remove Saddam as person they would be reluctant. But if it was to remove Saddam and make Iraq a stable place then I feel we would obligated to return - but how long untill we are free of that obligation?

Lets imagine a stable, democratic government is installed but in 10 or 50 years there's a successfull uprising - does that mean the war was in vain?