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Dr. Gonzo
September 13th, 2006, 04:18 PM
(This is my opinion on American foreign policy...I hope it'll make good debate. As usual, if you could give me advice on improving my writing it would be greatly appreciated. Don't take the first and second to last paragraphs seriously if you don't want...its just me being Menckenian.)

In all societies there is an organization of individuals, comprised mostly of repulsive and inept buffoons, who arrogate to themselves the title of “government”. This group of bumbling idiots is to be held responsible for society’s collective security. If the attacks of September 11th, have taught us anything it is that the government, like any other group of incompetent fools, is incapable of completing even the most basic human functions. Although it may seem unconventional, by using the law of economics, the country can create a sensible foreign policy.

A war on terror should be a war on the causes of terror—it should not be a war on individual terrorists. Wars that are not fought against conventional states with concrete goals must be waged in an entirely different way. To see how a “War on Terror” must inevitably fail, we must look to this country’s equally unsuccessful “War on Drugs”. The war on drugs must be fought on the demand side; that is, so long as people demand drugs and there is a profit in making them, a supply will always emerge. So, to wage a war on drugs, one must educate people and discourage them from drug use.
If we apply this lesson of supply and demand to terrorism, we will find that so long as there is the demand for terror, i.e. people look to terrorists to get things done for them, there will always be terrorists. How we go about ending the demand for terror is a question that the American government can not, and should not answer. It is a question that can be only answered in the negative. To end the demand for terror the American state must stop waging war. We must make it possible for them to develop social order through their own method. This social order will be one that lasts, unlike the fiat arrangement made by some moronic bureaucrat.

History is ripe with cases where exceptionally evil people were elevated to world power because of terrible economic depressions. There are people in America today who espouse the same hate rhetoric as Hitler, yet they do not attain national prominence. This is because there are alternatives to the state and people see the benefits of freedom. During the ‘20s and ‘30s, people followed Hitler because Western powers were able to deprive them of free markets by foisting the Versailles Treaty upon them.

When we restrict the liberty of Iraqis, we only breed contempt and indignation. We are stirring the pot of anti-American sentiment simply by not letting them rule themselves. Peace will not arise through a puppet government, but through legitimate decisions made by non-coerced Iraqis. The semblance of order that appears from government edict is infinitesimal compared to the deep-seated peace that emerges from voluntary social cooperation.

The next question we must ask is what should be done about those who have attacked us, such as Osama bin Laden? The answer is simple: bin Laden is a criminal and deserves to be treated as such. Attacking the entire country of Afghanistan is akin to demolishing the American Midwest in search of Timothy McVeigh. Terrorism needs to be combated with a scalpel, not a broad sword.

To call our President a moron would be an insult to the Vice President. Our Fearless Leaders are the proverbial scum of the Earth—unfortunately, it is these people who set our moral and intellectual standards. These knaves tell us that it is okay to murder and pillage. They condone mass violence and praise a culture of death. These are not the people to look up to. The people to admire are those who strive for freedom and liberty, who want to make the world better through voluntary, and not coercive measures.

The lesson of September 11th is the lesson of all of humanity: that government is best when it is not doing anything, especially waging war.

Perkis
September 13th, 2006, 05:58 PM
The lesson of September 11th is the lesson of all of humanity: that government is best when it is not doing anything, especially waging war.

Well I don't share your complete hatred of our goverment that you have but I agree with several of your points. The best way to fight terrorism is to get the underlying cause, because a military victory over them is not achieveable. At least not the way we are fighting them now. The way that our goverment is acting now lends credence to some of your statements. Years of failed foreign policy was responsible for the attacks, and it was only a matter of time. There are some major changes that need to be made and if they are not, I fear that it is not going to go well for us in the long run. I think that the United States is still the greatest country in the world, but I will tell you that when I read in the paper about secret memorandums being issued that allows torture.......I felt shame. Something, that when growing up if someone would have told me, I would have laughed in their face. I watch the news and read the papers and do not see the same country around me that I grew up in. Things are changing and, right now not for the better. I just hope that we can get things back to sanity and be what we are surely capable of.

mskurnic
September 15th, 2006, 02:57 PM
By using violence against those who havent harmed us, such as Iraq and the afghani people ( i seperate the people from the taliban government.), all we do is create more violence against ourselves. It is a neverending cycle. Someone in our government must realize that giving up our "Broad Sword" military approach is not a admission of defeat but a chance to regroup and change our approach to something such as what you said:

A war on terror should be a war on the causes of terror

Bessa
September 17th, 2006, 05:49 AM
A war on terror should be a war on the causes of terror—it should not be a war on individual terrorists. Wars that are not fought against conventional states with concrete goals must be waged in an entirely different way. To see how a “War on Terror” must inevitably fail, we must look to this country’s equally unsuccessful “War on Drugs”. The war on drugs must be fought on the demand side; that is, so long as people demand drugs and there is a profit in making them, a supply will always emerge. So, to wage a war on drugs, one must educate people and discourage them from drug use.

I'd have to agree 100%. However, when you take the buffoons who are "running" the government of the United States, and look into their portfolios, you can see the amount of profit they are making from physically going into an innocent nation and using bombs which must, of course, be replaced.

In addition, when questions arise from the connections between the warring Taliban leader and the US leader, these must be kept at bay; despite the fact that a real and honest pursuit of this "terrorist leader" has never been made by the "good guys in the US."

I think the lesson learned from 9/11 is that this is going to be a one world order and as the African Union has been set-up and the European Union has been set up, by the end of 2007, we will see the North American Union already in place and the abolition of the US will be complete. First good paying jobs, then a war, then cover-up the destruction of our constitutional government.

http://www.newswithviews.com/guest_opinion/guest99.htm

9/11 lessons? The government will use anything as a smokescreen...and if you buy enough senators and congressmen, you won't get impeached for doing it....

FruitandNut
September 18th, 2006, 12:08 AM
My advice is that you don't use the same terminology in an academic assignment!

Dr. Gonzo
September 18th, 2006, 03:09 AM
Haha...don't worry...in my writings for school I have found that the more socialist I sound, the better grade I get.

Bessa
September 18th, 2006, 04:23 AM
Haha...don't worry...in my writings for school I have found that the more socialist I sound, the better grade I get.

Ah the perpetuation of the myth of socialism in our schools....I think it's actually called critical thinking and reasoning....least ways that's what it appears to produce as opposed to abject and total homage to something you can neither define nor defend.

pikatore
September 19th, 2006, 03:47 AM
I think that is a very good paper, and agree with it completely.

Dr. Gonzo
September 19th, 2006, 11:21 AM
I think that is a very good paper, and agree with it completely.
Read Ludwig von Mises's short little essay Economic Calculation in the Socialist Commonwealth...you will no longer hold this severly flawed view. Economic calculation in socialism is impossible because there exists no objective manifestation, i.e. price, for higher order capital goods. As the means of production are not private owned, there can be no meaningful allocation of production goods. Period. End of story. No one has ever refuted Mises and no one ever will. With a stroke of his pen, he destroyed the incoherency of socialism.

Also if you want great critiques of Marxian economics, I could not suggest highly enough the great Austrian economist Eugen von Bohm-Bawerk. His destruction of Marx is slow, methodical, and complete. Even Marx would agree with Bohn-Bawerk.

pikatore
September 19th, 2006, 04:54 PM
will do