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  1. #1
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    Recommendations for our next book.

    I'd like to hear your suggestions for the next book we're going to discuss. This is just brainstorming, we'll do a formal nomination and vote a bit later, if that's ok with everyone.

  2. #2
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    "Anna Karenina" By, Leo Tolstoy
    ABOUT THIS BOOK
    Considered by some to be the greatest novel ever written, Anna Karenina is Tolstoy's classic tale of love and adultery set against the backdrop of high society in Moscow and Saint Petersburg. A rich and complex masterpiece, the novel charts the disastrous course of a love affair between Anna, a beautiful married woman, and Count Vronsky, a wealthy army officer. Tolstoy seamlessly weaves together the lives of dozens of characters, and in doing so captures a breathtaking tapestry of late-nineteenth-century Russian society.

    It's been on my "to read" list and Oprah actually covered it this month for her book club..

    Or how about
    Jack London: The call of the wild

    Richard Adams: Watership down

    Shirley Hazzard: The Great Fire


    Fyodor Dostoevsky:The Brothers Karamazov

    or

    Dickens:The Mystery of Edwin Drood

  3. #3
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    Maybe it's not for everyone, but a few of my friends have been talking about Invisible Monsters by Chuck Palahniuk (the same guy who wrote Fight Club). It's supposed to be funny, disturbing, and insightful all at once.

    My only qualm with Anna Karenina, Tinkerbell, is the fact that I can't grasp the Russian style names very well, and I have a hard time remembering who is who. And it's a slow start.
    "The essential act of war is destruction, not necessarily of human lives, but of the products of human labour. War is a way of shattering to pieces, or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea, materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable, and hence, in the long run, too intelligent." 1984, By George Orwell. Part 2: Chapter 9.

  4. #4
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    Good suggestions, guys. Books translated from 19th-century Russian can be a bit slow in the beginning, I'll agree with that Kneeless. But I've wanted to read Anna Karenina for a while. At least, I've been curious about it. As for Invisible Monsters, it certainly sounds interesting, but it might be a bit too dark and creepy for some members' tastes. Good possibility, though. Anyone else?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KneeLess
    Maybe it's not for everyone, but a few of my friends have been talking about Invisible Monsters by Chuck Palahniuk (the same guy who wrote Fight Club). It's supposed to be funny, disturbing, and insightful all at once.

    My only qualm with Anna Karenina, Tinkerbell, is the fact that I can't grasp the Russian style names very well, and I have a hard time remembering who is who. And it's a slow start.
    I had the same problem with the bible..SO I gave everyone Nicknames...
    Although Invisible Monsters sounds fun!

  6. #6
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    no... let's do some Michael Crichton books o_0

    or maybe star wars o_0

    or maybe the Bible

  7. #7
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    Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow are two books about the same story from two different peoples' perspectives. I think they're two extremely interesting books as well, but if we read either of them we'd have to read them both.
    Fortunately, the darkest of darkness is not as terrible as we fear.
    Unfortunately, the lightest of light, all things good, are not so wonderful as we hope for them to be.
    What, then, is left, but various shades of grey neutrality? Where are the heroes and villains? All I see are people.

  8. #8
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    Ender's Game was good, but all the following books just kept getting worse.

    I would highely recommend Dune, in my opinion its a classic.
    I typically cite original research papers and reviews that are available only to a personal or institutional subscriptional. If you wish a PDF copy of the papers I cite, send me a request.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by chadn737
    Ender's Game was good, but all the following books just kept getting worse.

    I would highely recommend Dune, in my opinion its a classic.
    I agree with the sequels to ender, though shadow was good. I wouldn't mind Dune either, I have a copy of that kicking around that I haven't read far into.
    Fortunately, the darkest of darkness is not as terrible as we fear.
    Unfortunately, the lightest of light, all things good, are not so wonderful as we hope for them to be.
    What, then, is left, but various shades of grey neutrality? Where are the heroes and villains? All I see are people.

  10. #10
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    I'm not really into scifi...some more thoughts to consider:

    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
    Animal Farm by George Orwell
    The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    Catch 22 by Joseph Heller
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
    "The essential act of war is destruction, not necessarily of human lives, but of the products of human labour. War is a way of shattering to pieces, or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea, materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable, and hence, in the long run, too intelligent." 1984, By George Orwell. Part 2: Chapter 9.

  11. #11
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    We've had some very interesting suggestions so far. Everything from religious texts to romance novels. I think we've brainstormed enough. I don't want to suggest anything, because as the BC leader, if I suggest something and then we read that book, I might be accused of throwing my weight around. I'm going to start an official nomination thread, with rules much like the nominations for DoM. This is my first time to officiate this process, so please be patient and bear with me. Let the nominations begin.

 

 

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