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  1. #41
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by ladyphoenix View Post
    Just shy of a year later, Scarlett, I got some questions for you...

    Talk to me about cats and pregnancy. I know that there's a disease... what predisposes someone to it? How do you keep from getting it if you have cats?

    Thanks!
    Toxoplasmosis.

    It's a protozoan parasitic disease.
    Persons with compromised immune systems, such as pregnant women, and those with HIV, are most susceptible.

    People can get it by eating raw or undercooked meat, or through accidental ingestion of cat feces.
    Cats contract it by eating rodents and other small wild animals, or by ingesting the feces of another infected cat.

    If you have an indoor cat, the best thing to do is have someone else change the litter box.

    If you have a cat who goes outdoors, if any of your neighbors have outdoor cats, or if there are feral cats in your area, you can contract it if you touch or handle soil that is contaminated with cat feces.

    Children's sandboxes that are left uncovered, can often contain cat feces as well.

    In summary, a pregnant woman should avoid raw or rare meat, and also should avoid coming into contact with cat feces.

    You can have a blood test to determine if you have ever been exposed to this parasite.
    Those who have never been exposed to it are at greater risk, if they are first exposed to it while pregnant, and their baby is at an increased risk as well.

    However, most OBs don't do toxoplasmosis screens on a routine basis, so it's something you would have to ask for, specifically.



    _________________________________ Post Merged _________________________________


    Quote Originally Posted by Aspoestertjie View Post
    Why is it so difficult to house train some dogs and others not?
    I have a duschound, and believe me I gave up on the house training. I let him sleep outside now because at least the winter is over now.
    What method of housetraining did you try, and also how old is your puppy now?

    Puppies less than 4 months old have very little bladder or sphincter control, so you can't really expect a puppy who is under 4 months to be truly housetrained.

    I have found that "crate training" works pretty well for most dogs.
    You can use this method with all dogs 4 months old, and older.

    Crate training is when you keep your dog in an indoor kennel, when you can't supervise him directly, while he is in the house.
    Take him outdoors after every feeding, after he wakes from a nap. after playtime, and the last thing before going in his kennel for the night.

    Also, feed him at the same approximate time every day.

    Dogs have a natural aversion to soiling where they sleep, and that's what crate training is based on.

    Every time you take him out of his kennel, take him outdoors to the place where you want him to eliminate, and make sure you take him to the same place each time.
    If he does not eliminate when you take him outside, put him back in his kennel, and take him outside again after about 15-20 minutes.
    Repeat this process until he eliminates outside.
    Every time he eliminates outside, give him a lot of praise and affection.

    If he has accidents in the house, you need to clean the area with an enzymatic odor eliminator, such as Nil-Odor, or Nature's Miracle Stain and Odor Remover.
    (You can get these at any large pet supply store, or I can tell you where to order it online, if you want to try it.)

    If you clean up the accident with ordinary soap, he can still smell where the accident occured, and he will eliminate in the same spot again.
    This may be what is happening.

    Also, do not spank him, or yell at him when he has an accident indoors.
    This does no good, and may prolong the housetraining process.

    You can also use pee-pee pads, which is a fairly simple housetraining method.
    Pee-pee pads are great for puppies under 4 months old, but they can be used with dogs of any age.

    They are absorbent pads that you put on the floor, and the pads are treated with a pheremone that encourages the dog to eliminate directly on the pad.

    Then just dispose of the pad.

    They work well, and I can tell you I'm using a lot of them these days, with the puppies.
    I can also tell you where to order them online, if you don't have a pet supply store in your area.
    There are many different brands of pee-pee pads.

    Another hint: If you haven't already done so, have him neutered, because unneutered male dogs have a tendency for marking their territory, and are much more difficult to housetrain, than neutered males.
    The same is true for unspayed females, although they don't mark as frequently as unneutered males.

    As for why some dogs are housetrained easier than others, I can tell you that dogs are a lot like children.
    They are all individuals, and each one has his/her own behavioral quirks.

    All dogs can be housetrained, even older ones, because the mother of my foster puppies was not housebroken when she came here, and I have trained her with no major problems.
    .
    Last edited by Scarlett44; September 10th, 2008 at 02:45 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  2. #42
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    No. I'm not pregnant, but thanks for asking. I intend to acquire a couple of cats, and I am likely to become pregnant... not long after...
    "And that, my lord, is how we know the Earth to be banana-shaped." ~ Monty Python


  3. #43
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Thanks Scarlett, I will definitely try and find out about the pads. Luckily I have tiles in my house and no carpets, so cleaning up is quite easy. I use strong cleaning materials which kills any bacteria, so it probably gets rid of the odor as well. I will give this advice to my sister in law as well, I think she will appreciate it.
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  4. #44
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Scarlett.....does the moon affect cats like it affects wolves? Our kitten is 4 months old now, and he is perfectly normal during the day....but, at night...he flips out. He turns into psycho kitty. He starts running around the house at top speed.....he attacks the beds.....and he jumps at us when we walk down the hall. Is that normal kitten behavior?
    I can only be who He allows me to be, I can only stand where He places me. 1Peter 5:6
    The true man wants two things: danger and play. For that reason he wants woman, as the most dangerous plaything. ---Friedrich Nietzsche

  5. #45
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by southernbelle View Post
    Scarlett.....does the moon affect cats like it affects wolves? Our kitten is 4 months old now, and he is perfectly normal during the day....but, at night...he flips out. He turns into psycho kitty. He starts running around the house at top speed.....he attacks the beds.....and he jumps at us when we walk down the hall. Is that normal kitten behavior?
    I know you're addressing this to Scarlett, but... I have to say... I've had male and female cats behave that way at all hours of the day. I wouldn't think it's at all unusual.
    "And that, my lord, is how we know the Earth to be banana-shaped." ~ Monty Python


  6. #46
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by ladyphoenix View Post
    I've had male and female cats behave that way at all hours of the day. I wouldn't think it's at all unusual.
    Yes, it's quite normal, it's called a "Frenetic Random Activity Period", and it happens in dogs also.
    "As long as I have a voice, I will speak for those who have none".

  7. #47
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    hmmm...it seems to happen mostly late at night. He's perfectly calm during the day, then, around 12:30, he flips out. I actually had to get out of bed last night and sit in the living room and wait for him to calm down.
    I can only be who He allows me to be, I can only stand where He places me. 1Peter 5:6
    The true man wants two things: danger and play. For that reason he wants woman, as the most dangerous plaything. ---Friedrich Nietzsche

  8. #48
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    I started this thread over two years ago, but I'm bumping it up to see if anyone has any problems they'd like to ask me concerning their dog or cat.....
    "As long as I have a voice, I will speak for those who have none".

  9. #49
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    I have two questions:

    1) My mother just got two collie puppies, and she really adores them. Unfortunately, she's not the most mobile of people and isn't really likely to be able to keep up with them once they finally get to be full-grown. She's a very conscientious person, knows how to take care of pets well, and absolutely loves playing with them in her own way. My concern is that I want to be able to provide her with a way of training them that will not be stressful to her or require her to be very mobile (she's morbidly obese and has bad knees). I was thinking about the Gentle Leader type "collars" after I saw an ad for them in Jen's car (my fiancee, a final year vet student). What's your opinion?

    2) My fiancee's dog, Sunday - 10+ yr old spayed lab mix - has had abandonment issues since she was a puppy and basically freaks out whenever Jen leaves the house. She is *very* attention-hungry and basically forces her attention on us if it's been "too long" since we acknowledged her (usually about 10-15 minutes), and her behavior has begun getting worse. She has begun tearing up things in the house when Jen leaves for work and has stopped eating the normal food she has always had. We know and understand that it's probably an attention/boredom thing and a way of showing her displeasure at Jen for leaving her alone all day... but it's not really helpful to know that if we can't do anything about it. Do you have any suggestions on helping us cope with her needy behavior and getting her to stop tearing things up?

  10. #50
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Hey Scar, just wanted to let you know that Mr. Stinky is no longer so Stinky. Fo realz!

    The solution? We bought a house back in May and he has access to go outside to our backyard and around our neighborhood. He no longer eats then directly after cleans himself, he now likes to eat and then go out and play. Nor does he have his liter box parties anymore, he goes outside (I guess). This has saved us a lot of money on kitty litter, btw.

    Also, I bought him a pink t-shirt and he loves wearing it. I think. Can he consent to wearing it? And can I be so sure that he loves to wear it? He does not take it off or protest when I put it on, and he keeps it on until I have to take it off of him when it gets dirty.

    I was thinking of building a small boat for him. We live near the sea and I think it would be pretty cool/cute to put him in a mini sail boat with like a sailor suit on. But... he can't consent to that either, can he? And he hates water, I think. Or does he just have a funny way of showing me that he loves it? I don't know. I'm so conflicted. Would it be animal abuse to do this whole Sailor Stinky thing?

  11. #51
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    I am just worried about my dog's balls. It still didn't come out and he is almost 10 months now.

    Should his internal testicals be removed? Does he have a greater chance of getting cancer?
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  12. #52
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlett44 View Post
    I started this thread over two years ago, but I'm bumping it up to see if anyone has any problems they'd like to ask me concerning their dog or cat.....
    Actually, I am glad you did, Scarlett. My wife and I are planning on getting a cat (both of us are hardcore cat lovers*), and we would like to know your opinion about declawing. I have owned three cats in the past and all were declawed, yet some have told us that declawing is somehow bad for cats. Your opinions on declawing would be greatly appreciated.


    * With all of the talk about zoophilia, I think it is necessary to make it clear that I mean that in a platonic sense.

  13. #53
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    I didn't know this was a thread.

    So, I've got a deaf dog (D.D. which stands for...Deaf Dog)

    And she HATES HATES HATES riding in the car. She freaks out, barks, runs around, make a high-pitch squealing noise and generally hates it. We've tried a couple of "tranquilizers"; however, they dont' seem to affect her in the car. She powers thru them and then after she's out of the car zonks out.

    We've given them to her 30 min before leaving, and one-hour before leaving. And no matter how many times we've taken her in the car, it never is any better. Toys, food, or any other "incentive" do not work.

    My only other idea is to give her the pills +1 hour before, let her get real groggy, and hope the car doesn't make her go bananas.

    any ideas?

  14. #54
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by Talthas View Post
    1) My mother just got two collie puppies, and she really adores them. Unfortunately, she's not the most mobile of people and isn't really likely to be able to keep up with them once they finally get to be full-grown. She's a very conscientious person, knows how to take care of pets well, and absolutely loves playing with them in her own way. My concern is that I want to be able to provide her with a way of training them that will not be stressful to her or require her to be very mobile (she's morbidly obese and has bad knees). I was thinking about the Gentle Leader type "collars" after I saw an ad for them in Jen's car (my fiancee, a final year vet student). What's your opinion?
    The Gentle Leader headcollar is a great training lead--it helps the dog not to pull so much when walking on a leash.
    I use the GL for one of my dogs who has a tendency to pull on his leash.
    When you buy one, it comes with a very informative DVD about how to fit it and use it properly.
    They are a little more expensive than a regular collar, but well worth the price.
    I think your mom would find it much easier to walk these puppies with GLs.

    However, I'm a little concerned because the Collie is a large active breed that needs a lot of exercise.
    If they don't get enough exercise, they tend to develop behavior problems such as excessive barking, digging, and chewing up inappropriate items.

    If your mom is not very mobile, I suggest she hire a trustworthy dogwalker for the dogs, or take them to a "doggie day-care", if there is one available in your area, so she can be sure they are getting enough activity.


    Quote Originally Posted by Talthas
    My fiancee's dog, Sunday - 10+ yr old spayed lab mix - has had abandonment issues since she was a puppy and basically freaks out whenever Jen leaves the house. She is *very* attention-hungry and basically forces her attention on us if it's been "too long" since we acknowledged her (usually about 10-15 minutes), and her behavior has begun getting worse. She has begun tearing up things in the house when Jen leaves for work and has stopped eating the normal food she has always had. We know and understand that it's probably an attention/boredom thing and a way of showing her displeasure at Jen for leaving her alone all day... but it's not really helpful to know that if we can't do anything about it. Do you have any suggestions on helping us cope with her needy behavior and getting her to stop tearing things up?
    I take it that there aren't any other dogs in the house except her.
    If that's the case, her separation anxiety is probably getting somewhat worse due to age-related senility.

    It sounds incredible, but the vet I work for has prescribed the canine version of Prozac for several dogs with this kind of separation anxiety.
    Your fiancee could check with her regular veterinarian about a medication to help with the anxiety, since it sounds like it's gotten worse than usual.

    If meds aren't an option because of the dog's age or other health issues, I would suggest purchasing an indoor wire kennel crate to keep her in while nobody is home, and this would keep her from tearing up things in the house.
    In addition to the kennel, you could try leaving the television on while you're gone.
    I have found that this works because the dog will be comforted by the sound of human voices.

    As for her food,when dogs get older, they do sometimes become picky eaters.
    If her regular food has always been dry food, try mixing in some good quality canned dog food along with the dry food.
    This usually works to help a picky eater regain interest.

    Also, in the past, I have mixed in melted vanilla ice cream with dry dog food, for some of my new foster dogs that wouldn't eat.
    If you do try that, don't use any kind of ice cream except vanilla (NEVER chocolate, because dogs are very sensitive to a chemical in chocolate, and it could cause an adverse reaction).


    ---------- Post added at 08:15 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:57 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Zombie View Post
    Hey Scar, just wanted to let you know that Mr. Stinky is no longer so Stinky. Fo realz!

    The solution? We bought a house back in May and he has access to go outside to our backyard and around our neighborhood. He no longer eats then directly after cleans himself, he now likes to eat and then go out and play. Nor does he have his liter box parties anymore, he goes outside (I guess). This has saved us a lot of money on kitty litter, btw.
    Wonderful...kitty litter IS expensive...

    Quote Originally Posted by PZ
    Also, I bought him a pink t-shirt and he loves wearing it. I think. Can he consent to wearing it? And can I be so sure that he loves to wear it? He does not take it off or protest when I put it on, and he keeps it on until I have to take it off of him when it gets dirty.
    It doesn't sound like he minds wearing it..so I wouldn't worry about him having a t-shirt on...

    Quote Originally Posted by PZ
    I was thinking of building a small boat for him. We live near the sea and I think it would be pretty cool/cute to put him in a mini sail boat with like a sailor suit on. But... he can't consent to that either, can he? And he hates water, I think. Or does he just have a funny way of showing me that he loves it? I don't know. I'm so conflicted. Would it be animal abuse to do this whole Sailor Stinky thing?
    Considering my own personal experiences with cats and water--you could try it, but I don't think he'll be very pleased with the whole situation...

    ---------- Post added at 08:34 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:15 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Aspoestertjie View Post
    I am just worried about my dog's balls. It still didn't come out and he is almost 10 months now.

    Should his internal testicals be removed? Does he have a greater chance of getting cancer?
    If one or both of his testicles have still not descended, that is called cryptorchidism.
    It's is a fairly common defect in dogs.
    Dogs with cryptorchid testicles are very prone to testicular torsion and testicular cancer.
    Testicular torsion is when the spermatic cord becomes twisted, cutting off the blood supply to the testicle.

    Therefore, to avoid these potentially serious problems, I would advise you to have his testicles surgically removed ASAP....

    ---------- Post added at 09:03 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:34 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by czahar View Post
    Actually, I am glad you did, Scarlett. My wife and I are planning on getting a cat (both of us are hardcore cat lovers*), and we would like to know your opinion about declawing. I have owned three cats in the past and all were declawed, yet some have told us that declawing is somehow bad for cats. Your opinions on declawing would be greatly appreciated.
    Why did you have your previous cats declawed?

    Neither one of my cats are declawed, and I've never had any problems with them destroying things in my house.
    I've always provided them with a scratching post, which they use, so I've never really had a reason to declaw them.

    Speaking as a pet care professional, I have noticed that declawed cats in general are more likely to bite, and they also have more "litterbox issues" , than cats who have all their claws--so there are some negative behaviors that could result from declawing.

    So, in summary, I guess I'm saying that cats CAN develop behavior problems as a result of declawing, so declawing shouldn't be done unless there is very good reason for it.

    ---------- Post added at 09:08 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:03 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by thegreenape View Post
    I didn't know this was a thread.

    So, I've got a deaf dog (D.D. which stands for...Deaf Dog)

    And she HATES HATES HATES riding in the car. She freaks out, barks, runs around, make a high-pitch squealing noise and generally hates it. We've tried a couple of "tranquilizers"; however, they dont' seem to affect her in the car. She powers thru them and then after she's out of the car zonks out.

    We've given them to her 30 min before leaving, and one-hour before leaving. And no matter how many times we've taken her in the car, it never is any better. Toys, food, or any other "incentive" do not work.

    My only other idea is to give her the pills +1 hour before, let her get real groggy, and hope the car doesn't make her go bananas.

    any ideas?
    Is the medication called acepromazine?

    If so, give it to her TWO hours before getting in the car.
    In my experience, it takes about two hours for this type of med to take full effect.

    If it's not acepromazine--what is it?
    .
    Last edited by Scarlett44; October 25th, 2009 at 05:40 PM.
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  15. #55
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlett44 View Post
    If one or both of his testicles have still not descended, that is called cryptorchidism.
    It's is a fairly common defect in dogs.
    Dogs with cryptorchid testicles are very prone to testicular torsion and testicular cancer.
    Testicular torsion is when the spermatic cord becomes twisted, cutting off the blood supply to the testicle.

    Therefore, to avoid these potentially serious problems, I would advise you to have his testicles surgically removed ASAP....
    Auch! For him and for me. It will be expensive I am sure...
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by Aspoestertjie View Post
    Auch! For him and for me. It will be expensive I am sure...
    What type of dog is he? Is he a small, medium, or large breed?

    I'm not sure how it is around there, but most vets around here, base the price on the weight of the animal..

    ---------- Post added at 07:20 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:18 PM ----------

    I believe when I had my cat neutered it was only around (I think) 50 bucks...

    I have not gotten my dog neutered just yet, but I am planning on having it done real soon..
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlett44 View Post

    It sounds incredible, but the vet I work for has prescribed the canine version of Prozac for several dogs with this kind of separation anxiety.
    Your fiancee could check with her regular veterinarian about a medication to help with the anxiety, since it sounds like it's gotten worse than usual.

    If meds aren't an option because of the dog's age or other health issues, I would suggest purchasing an indoor wire kennel crate to keep her in while nobody is home, and this would keep her from tearing up things in the house.
    In addition to the kennel, you could try leaving the television on while you're gone.
    I have found that this works because the dog will be comforted by the sound of human voices.
    My brother has an absolutely neurotic lab-mix named Daisy who used to be the same way (I've heard separation anxiety is somewhat common in labs especially). Even with another dog in the house, and older and established dog at that, Daisy would literally tear the house up when my brother or his wife left. She ate an entire couch in less than an hour, and I mean completely destroyed - very little fabric was attached to the wooden frame, and even parts of the frame were gnawed through (and she's not even that big of a dog!). They tried kenneling her, but she ate her way through 3 plastic kennels, until they bought a fairly heavy-duty one. She broke out of that as well, loosing two teeth and gouging a deep cut in her back in the process.

    They put her on that "doggie downer" medication, and kept working with her every day. The dog was basically doped up for a year, when they stopped the meds. She pretty much stayed a good dog after that, even after my brother and his wife got divorced and she took the "good" dog, Allie, with her. Daisy is still a little needy, but she listens now. She just worms her nose under your hand and suggests, strongly, that you pet her. The only behavioral problem she has now is climbing on furniture, which is really nothing more than an old habit, and one that is easily cured by putting throw pillows on every individual seat cushion, like where your butt goes, on every individual seat in the room when you leave.
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlett44 View Post
    Why did you have your previous cats declawed?

    Neither one of my cats are declawed, and I've never had any problems with them destroying things in my house.
    I've always provided them with a scratching post, which they use, so I've never really had a reason to declaw them.

    Speaking as a pet care professional, I have noticed that declawed cats in general are more likely to bite, and they also have more "litterbox issues" , than cats who have all their claws--so there are some negative behaviors that could result from declawing.

    So, in summary, I guess I'm saying that cats CAN develop behavior problems as a result of declawing, so declawing shouldn't be done unless there is very good reason for it.[COLOR="red"].
    Well, I owned both of my cats when I was fairly young and it was my mother who had them declawed. She may have been doing so on some bad information she had gotten from a friend or professional. Either way, I will look into the issue before I get another cat.

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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Quote Originally Posted by czahar View Post
    Well, I owned both of my cats when I was fairly young and it was my mother who had them declawed. She may have been doing so on some bad information she had gotten from a friend or professional. Either way, I will look into the issue before I get another cat.
    Oh okay, gotcha....

    Most people want to get their cats declawed because they are afraid of the cat destroying their furniture.

    But I always suggest to them that they first provide the cat with a scratching post to use, and see if that works, before they resort to declawing.

    ---------- Post added at 11:51 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:47 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Gonzo View Post
    They put her on that "doggie downer" medication, and kept working with her every day. The dog was basically doped up for a year, when they stopped the meds. She pretty much stayed a good dog after that, even after my brother and his wife got divorced and she took the "good" dog, Allie, with her. Daisy is still a little needy, but she listens now.
    Great..I'm happy to hear that meds worked for Daisy...
    These meds have helped a lot of dogs with separation anxiety issues
    "As long as I have a voice, I will speak for those who have none".

  20. #60
    ODN Community Regular

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    I'm not from here, NV
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    Re: Canine And Feline Concerns Addressed Here

    Scarlett44, I am getting a kitten in about three weeks. He'll JUST be weaned when I get him. I can't decide on cat food. The only thing I've read that seems pretty consistent is high in protein, and wet. Do you have any suggestions?
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." ~Bertrand Russell

 

 
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