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  1. #1
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    Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    Hello people... recently a fellow martial artist told me of a method of meditation that involves breathing in fully then releasing only 50 to 80 % of the air and repeating the whole process... supposedly it is a relativelly easy method of meditation because one gets a relative "high" on oxygen... it slows down thought process and allows for a person to obtain peace, and mental silence without much effort... do not try this method without the full details... But, anyway the questions are, can one get "high" on oxygen? what might the consequences be? Is oxygen addictive? can this be done while driving? how about training, running, and fighting?

  2. #2
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    Re: Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    Of course it cannot be done while driving. The entire purpose for meditation in the martial arts is to clear your mind of anything of importance (good or bad) restore balance of the inner self, as well as to prepare your self mentally for the what you are about to do for the next hour or so.
    That is simple meditation. So far as deep breathing and controlled exhaling a couple of things. I've never hear of only letting half your air out and then breathing in again. Basically you are leaving your lungs half-full. I can see where one can get a what they may consider as a high but it is not the same high runners get. In other words, hyperventilation will not release any endorphins which is a natural "upper". I can see no benefit to practice breathing in such a way though I suppose there could be.

    Now releasing 80% of the air is more likely. What many people do not know is that even when a person exhales as much as they can they still have a 15 to 20 per cent of oxygen in your lungs. That is why, (since you are in MA's it may have happened) when someone gets the all the wind knocked out of them they will lay on their side, assume something close to a fetal position and then gasp in tiny amounts of air and first and then within a few minutes they gasp larger amounts of air and within 5 minutes most have fully recovered. The reason one cannot breath when they get the air forced out of their lungs. That is because the lungs naturally retain about 10% of air. This acts to "prime the pump" that allow the lungs to fully function. So when the person is barely able to gasp they are bit by bit bringing that needed 10& "primer" air in their lungs before their lungs can operate as they should. I do not do deep breathing during meditation as (I'm sure it 80/20) does some good, in fact more good than I know about. I have my students breath 80/20 after a run or a hard workout. I teach them how to breath in a way that restores the oxygen to the lungs more quickly than gasping can.

    But, anyway the questions are, can one get "high" on oxygen?No.

    You may get dizzy for several moments but not "high". However if you breathe concentrated oxygen, (I think there is a bar around here that actually does this) you will indeed get a minor high that last about 5 to 10 minutes and then return to normal. (I'm going by what people who have tried it told me, I've never done it myself.

    what might the consequences be?
    Pointed out above.

    Is oxygen addictive?
    Well yeah, if we care to keep living. Seriously, no, oxygen (even concentrated) cannot get you addicted. The definition of (physical) addiction is when your body has to have it to function on a daily basis. Of course you need oxygen to survive but the body builds no immunity to oxygen as it does with many drugs.

    can this be done while driving? how about training, running, and fighting?
    It is my opinion that no one should drive if they are high from anything. So I would say no. So far as training though it may be helpful ringside to have oxygen, it is not good to train that way. Otherwise (unless you carry oxygen around with you and have time to use it) if you must defend yourself in a fight your body will be used to not getting winded so easily if you practice 80/20. But concentrated oxygen should not be necessary to train. The entire idea of training is to be in the best condition you can be in. If you are used to breathing oxygen just to workout, then when not available you will get winded faster than if you do not use concentrated oxygen when training.

    Same with fighting. (IMO) Anything that alters the senses ultimately works against one when the need to fight arises.

    There are probably a few people here who do the kind of breathing exercise you are referring to. They would be of more help. I only deep breathed meditation a short time on the advice of a friend. It was not to get high however. There were results (from the deep breathing) I found difficult to deal with so I stopped it. (not physical results)
    When the power of love becomes stronger than the love of power, there will be peace..........jimi hendrix.

  3. #3
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    Re: Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    yo thnx for the reply... I have gotten dizzy trying it, but also a sort of high, once in a while... its like you are really relaxed, your body tingles, general euphoria, losing track of time, sweating etc. etc. etc... I just dont know if it qualifies as a high, the long term and short term effects, and what could be the reason for it... anyway I have done it before a Karate class and gotten lots of "kime" and impact, reduced muscle pain from exercise and increased my learning speed... Its really hard to do it while training because one runs out of breath, but when I have managed, it has the same effects as above with the eventual dizzyness, nausea, and general fatigue... I have yet to try it while sparring... however I think if I master this it will be useful... for example, I was trying a block to the jab with backfist combo I had never done before and I managed to do it correctly the first try and on until I ran out of breath...

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    Re: Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    Dont do it, your putting yourself into respiratoy acidosis. co2 in the body is potential acid, the more you retain, the more acidic your pH becomes. You wont die,it would take a tremendous pH shift which wont happen based on what you described, but repeated attempts can cause damage. O2 is a drug, use it wisely, but O2 is different than room air. Hi-yahhhhhh
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  5. #5
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    Re: Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    so... you are saying that although I am "burning more fuel" by adding O2 to my "mix", I am also killing the "engine"?

  6. #6
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    Re: Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    You're actually not adding more O2 to the mix, your retaining CO2. Check this out, it sounds similar to what you posted about the effects.

    www.anaesthesiamcq.com/AcidBaseBook/ab4_4.php
    "People are People..."

  7. #7
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    Re: Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    WOOW... amazing man... great post... this is it... thnx... thats what I was looking for... great rep to follow... yes, anesthetic effects, heat, everything... I'm very suceptible to cold... I usually feel cold, when everyone else is warm, and the skin temperature in my hands is usually dead cold, but when I manage to do this in the coldest temperatures I've been in, I get so hot I sweat... honestly I doubt I will stop though... I am not afraid of hurting myself like that, and the effects are very beneficial to my priorities... thnx again man... I wonder what "beneficial" effects this has... I've felt the best effects after it is done... even better than during... I wonder why... cool, so I'm not going crazy...

  8. #8
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    Re: Doctor's... Question about method of meditation

    Altering your blood pH by breathing is quite easy to do, but unless there is some sort of pathology you won't actually be able to do much damage to yourself by trying it.

    That said, I'm surprised your "air hunger" hasn't gotten the best of you when you try this exercise. Our primary respiratory drive is fueled by CO2, so when you hold some of your air in, you're building up levels of CO2 and that should make you almost unbearably uncomfortable after a time so that you finally have no choice but to breathe normally. What you're describing is essentially the same effect that asthmatics and people with emphysema have, except you're doing it on purpose. Basically, asthmatics and COPD-ers can't exhale properly because their airways are either constricted or collapsed. This causes them to retain a lot more air than normal, jacking their CO2 way up and eventually causing their lungs to hyper-expand.

    The long-term effects of hyper-inflating your lungs can be dangerous, so be careful when you try this. Also, while it's difficult to actually hurt yourself by using your breathing to alter your blood's pH, it *can* be done. It's a lot more common to see the opposite of what you're doing, though. People who have panic attacks or who hyperventilate often describe a tingling and "buzzing" sensation in their bodies, because they're "blowing off" all their CO2 and making themselves alkalemic. The effects of hypocapnia (too little CO2) can resemble anything from a seizure to a pulmonary embolus, and I've seen people come into the ER thinking they were going to die because they had been hyperventilating without realizing it. Of course, they got a lot better once they slowed their breathing down. but you can really throw your body out of whack by messing with your CO2 levels.

    I don't see too much harm in doing this breathing exercise as long as you're sensible about it, but do keep these things in mind.

 

 

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