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  1. #1
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    Convicted Felons

    This idea came from another thread about voter registration.

    In some states in the US convicted felons do not have the right to vote.

    So this is my question to you (and depending how people respond... well we will have to see where it goes).

    What do you expects prisons to do?

    Should they rehabilitate? Change offenders into good citizens?

    Should they punish?

    Your thoughts please. If things go as I think they will, this should go somewhere.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Hmm...I believe that some people can be rehabilitated, so every prisoner should be required to undergo some kind of rehabilitation program according to the crime they were convicted of. Failure to complete the program means you are not released.

    Prisoners should be rewarded for good behavior and punished for bad. I think there is too much punishment for wrongdoing and not enough praise when a prisoner actually does the right thing. Praising them might make them more likely to make an effort to change.

    I think they should still be allowed to vote. They are still citizens of the country, and their vote is as important as anyone elses so let them cast their vote I say.

    Hopefully this is what you were asking for, if not, let me know.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by DevilPup John View Post
    In some states in the US convicted felons do not have the right to vote.
    Very strange.

    What do you expects prisons to do?

    Should they rehabilitate? Change offenders into good citizens?

    Should they punish?

    Your thoughts please. If things go as I think they will, this should go somewhere.

    First I expect prisons to keep dangerous offenders locked up. So In a sense I expect them to protect the citizens.

    Most prisons do have rehabilitation programmes, or so I hope. I feel that a prisoner's will to be rehabilitated should be established. I am also of opinion that some offenders are unable to rehabilitate due to their genetic make up. I can however be wrong, so feel free to contest that.

    Some prisoners will never be citizens or part of society again. Those that get LWOP or the death penalty will serve as examples. I would say in many if not most cases, these felons can not be rehabilitated. The reason why I say this is because the whole idea with "rehabilitation" is to release such a person back into society. There is no need to even try and rehabilitate these persons and I will feel it will be a waist of time to even try.

    Your question about "Should they punish?" is a little weird. Prison = punishment. Or that is how I see it anyway, unless you mean punishment for specific things they do wrong while in prison? Punishment while in prison forms an integral part of rehabilitation, so they are linked and I don't see it as two separate issues.

    And to come to voting the following-

    There can be a thousand reasons why people go to prison. Some go because of fraud. Some go because of steeling.

    I would say those convicted for murder should not be allowed to vote, as they will not be released into society again. Unless you want to tell me that they have a say about how a country is run when they will not form part of that specific society again?

    Those convicted of less serious crimes have every right to vote. These people have a good chance of being rehabilitated and will most likely be released back into society again. It will only be fair to allow them to vote because that will give them a sense of responsibility and will make them feel part of a said society. If they don't feel they form part of a society, then why should they respect it's laws?

    Well, that is how I see it anyway.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    I disagree with everyone. I like disagreeing with everyone.

    Convicted felons are citizens who have been deprived of their freedom. I will briefly address the issue of rehabilitation as it has been raised by previous posters here:

    There are a number of purposes in sentencing. These are:

    1. Rehabilitation - ordering a sentence that will be conducive to the offender's ability to rehabilitate herself/himself and become a productive (or at least non-destructive) member of the community.

    2. General deterrence - this is to 'scare' other potential offenders against similar offending. A person who sees some conduct punished is arguably less likely to engage in that conduct himself.

    3. Specific deterrence - this is to 'scare' the offender herself/himself from reoffending.

    4. Denunciation - this is to demonstrate to the offender that the community does not tolerate his/her conduct.

    5. Just (fair) punishment. This is in effect an element of retribution.

    Rehabilitation is indeed one of the aspects of sentencing. Prisons should always have programs in place to attempt to facilitate rehabilitation of offenders.

    All that said, there is no reason why prisoners should not be able to vote. Their punishment (in all of the 5 senses) is imprisonment; loss of freedom. Why should they also be precluded from voting?

    NB. I do agree with Aspo on one point. Some people's makeup is such that they are beyond rehabilitation. She calls it genetic makeup. I would go further and say that our makeup is more than that as it also includes our experiences, how our brain reacts to situations, etc. I in fact believe (more than that, I am firmly convinced) that there is no free will at all and everything we do or do not do is due to our makeup. However, that is way beyond this topic. Suffice to say that, in the minimum, I agree with Aspo that at least some people cannot be rehabilitated as they're in effect predestined by their genetic makeup to be offenders. This raises a question, however. How can we attach moral culpability to someone who cannot stop herself/himself from offending no matter how much she/he would like to?

  5. #5
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Ok, this is a fun one.

    First of all, rehabilitation programs only work if you want to rehabilitate. It's not really a fault of the prison system that it works like it does; it's really the fault of the prisoners inside that create their own society that not only encourages unacceptable behavior, but in most cases also teaches their fellow inmates how to be real criminals.

    If a prison could come up with a way to control every aspect of a prisoners life, 24 hrs a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, then maybe forced rehabilitation could be possible, but the logistics of making that happen are next to impossible. I have two friends that work in the prison system, and it's all they can do to stay out of shank range most of the time. Both of these people are diminutive women, both good friends and one a former love interest. I worry about them a lot.

    Should a felon be able to vote? Hmmm. I would say no. Not only do they not respect the laws that they would have nominally helped create (by participating in the elections of the officials who make the laws), but their policies toward the rest of America, you know, the law abiding part, would probably not match up with the mainstream. How could a person running for an inner-city, crime-ridden town's Mayoral office secure the "convict" vote? By promising to reducing prison sentences, of course! I can't really see any good that could come from that.

    I really don't think we should let people who break the law have an influence on how those laws are made.
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  6. #6
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Gonzo View Post
    Ok, this is a fun one.

    First of all, rehabilitation programs only work if you want to rehabilitate. It's not really a fault of the prison system that it works like it does; it's really the fault of the prisoners inside that create their own society that not only encourages unacceptable behavior, but in most cases also teaches their fellow inmates how to be real criminals.

    If a prison could come up with a way to control every aspect of a prisoners life, 24 hrs a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, then maybe forced rehabilitation could be possible, but the logistics of making that happen are next to impossible. I have two friends that work in the prison system, and it's all they can do to stay out of shank range most of the time. Both of these people are diminutive women, both good friends and one a former love interest. I worry about them a lot.

    Should a felon be able to vote? Hmmm. I would say no. Not only do they not respect the laws that they would have nominally helped create (by participating in the elections of the officials who make the laws), but their policies toward the rest of America, you know, the law abiding part, would probably not match up with the mainstream. How could a person running for an inner-city, crime-ridden town's Mayoral office secure the "convict" vote? By promising to reducing prison sentences, of course! I can't really see any good that could come from that.

    I really don't think we should let people who break the law have an influence on how those laws are made.
    Are you saying we should be able to screen out good voters from bad voters and only allow those who we think would be good voters to vote? Dangerous proposition I suggest. And it flies in the face of democracy.

    Also, you appear to be completely disregarding the fact that prisoners are humans, just like you and me. They too are concerned about a large variety of social issues. You seem to think that once a person gets locked up, all s/he thinks about is how to get out. It's untrue and unsubstantiated. Laws which govern them are made by elected representatives. They therefore should have an input into who those representatives will be.

    As for your point about the "convict" vote, it's a plain fallacy. Convicts make up a small minority of the entire population. If a candidate is going to jeapoardise her/his vote from non-convicts by showing sympathy towards convicts then s/he is not going very far with her/his election efforts.
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  7. #7
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Voting is the process by which we elect our officials. Our officials should be representative of the electorate. They are public servants, charged with carrying out the will of the people.

    How is the will of the people (as a whole) being served if a particular sect has a say in determining the course of new legislation, possible changing of penal statutes and penalties, appointment of judges and sheriffs, etc and have already proven to not respect the law in the first place? Should a convicted murderer have the ability to vote against the man who arrested him, on the grounds that he'd still be evading justice were it not for Sheriff So-and-so?

    A demonstrated lack of respect for the law should preclude someone from having a voice in the creation or enforcement of law, which is the ultimate extension of the voting process. That is my opinion.
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  8. #8
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Gonzo View Post
    Voting is the process by which we elect our officials. Our officials should be representative of the electorate. They are public servants, charged with carrying out the will of the people.

    How is the will of the people (as a whole) being served if a particular sect has a say in determining the course of new legislation, possible changing of penal statutes and penalties, appointment of judges and sheriffs, etc and have already proven to not respect the law in the first place? Should a convicted murderer have the ability to vote against the man who arrested him, on the grounds that he'd still be evading justice were it not for Sheriff So-and-so?

    A demonstrated lack of respect for the law should preclude someone from having a voice in the creation or enforcement of law, which is the ultimate extension of the voting process. That is my opinion.
    Therefore you also would be suggesting that a person who has been to jail should not be allowed to vote once released either. Surely

    Besides why should not a convicted murderer be able to vote? I don't understand your logic. Many of us have personal reasons to vote or not to vote for someone. Voting is free of any obligation to show reasons. You vote for who you like. The question WHY you like them is irrelevant. It's a democracy. Are you concerned that the wrong officials will get into office because suddenly the right ones will get voted out by a sudden surge of murderer votes? Surely not.
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  9. #9
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Gonzo View Post
    A demonstrated lack of respect for the law should preclude someone from having a voice in the creation or enforcement of law, which is the ultimate extension of the voting process. That is my opinion.
    I generally agree, but there is the case where if laws are unjust, the unjust lawmakers can simply jail anyone who opposes said law to deprive them the voice to change it.

    I think perhaps there are some laws that should take away your vote and some that perhaps should not. I usually am for folks who have "served their time" getting their vote back. I'm a bit conflicted on those still serving, I think there are some decent reasons on both sides of the issue. At the moment I think our drug laws are rather unjust and that its created a much larger criminal class in our country of people that don't really belong in jail. (because they aren't at heart predatory.

  10. #10
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Then call it one more incentive to not commit felonies.

    Whether or not one considers a law unjust... that's not really the point. The right thing to do is work to get the law changed (through voting and writing your congressman), and not just break it because you don't agree with it.

    Just curious, are there any felonies that you consider to be unjust?
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Gonzo View Post
    Whether or not one considers a law unjust or not, that's not really the point. The right thing to do is work to get the law changed (through voting and writing your congressman), and not just break it because you don't agree with it.

    Just curious, are there any felonies that you consider to be unjust?
    I generally agree. My sympathy for drug crimes only extends to typical "users" and even then I think they are foolish. Honestly I don't know enough what is a felony and what is not to answer that question well. I'm generally against our "sin laws" (aka prostitution and drugs) and in the past laws enforcing segregation are very immoral in my opinion.

    Generally I think if a law is unjust enough then people will seek to have it changed eventually. While moment to moment I don't trust every individual, over time I think the American spirit is a good one and moves towards greater justice.

    Actually many of the laws I dislike most are minor violations and are usually state laws. They are designed to protect the property and safety of the middle and upper class but they often end up placing large fines on the lower class that can't actually afford to pay any of them (and often they are simply ignorant such laws exist). Unable to pay the fines they are often sent to jail or constantly hounded which only serves to make it harder for them to get decent jobs and get out of that situation. I've been there myself and while its not escape proof it certainly isn't very rational.

    Americas very high incarceration rate concerns me, but in general I am a pretty law and order fellow and I think if you break the law you do need to face the music.

  12. #12
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Sorry I have not gotten back to any of you yet. I have a lot of fun research work to do...

    Ill start responding when the weekend starts .
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  13. #13
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Yeah, I don't necessarily agree with the "sin laws" either, to some extent, but most of those are misdemeanors. Possession of narcotics up to a certain amount is a misdemeanor in most areas (and for most drugs... as far as I know, even a gram of heroin is a felony most places). However, if you have, say, 10 kilos of coke, you're going away for a long, long time, and I agree with that. I've never met a drug user that wasn't a generally nice person (I don't know any meth heads), but I've worked in drug interdiction in the past and I can't think of even one verifiable "trafficker" that I'd sit down in a coffee shop to have a conversation with. They're generally just bad people.

    Same thing with prostitution. Again, as far as I know, turning tricks is a misdemeanor in most places, but pimping, if a credible case can be built against you, is considered Human Trafficking, which is most definitely a felony and is right up there with kidnapping on the FBI's most hated crimes list.

    You can argue that the laws against the sale of narcotics or mujeres de la noche are the only reasons why big-time drug dealers and pimps are bad people, because the risk vs reward ratio in their chosen professions makes them have to act with extreme violence without hesitation if they want to be successful and stay out of jail... but it still doesn't make what they do right.

    Because there are people like that out there, those laws are a good thing in my opinion. And no, they shouldn't get to vote, for the other reasons I stated above.
    Last edited by Dr Gonzo; October 24th, 2008 at 01:02 PM.
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Gonzo View Post
    You can argue that the laws against the sale of narcotics or mujeres de la noche are the only reasons why big-time drug dealers and pimps are bad people, because the risk vs reward ration in their chosen professions makes them have to act with extreme violence without hesitation if they want to be successful and stay out of jail... but it still doesn't make what they do right.
    I agree. There are people who are criminals by trade. If something else were illegal they would be doing that instead. They are attracted to the profit margins and the outlaw status, or at least it seems that way. Bad folks.

  15. #15
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    All citizens should be able to vote. They are citizens of the country and need to live by it's laws, but the laws don't change overnight with a change of office, so, the laws probably stay the same. WHy would criminals not be allowed to vote if they are in prison? Tey will be returning to that world when they are done there so they should be able to vote for whomever they want. That said there isn't a great deal of people who go to prison. Now if you take into account all the people that commit crimes and don't get caught and can still vote, would they make a vote for a country they think is worse off? It is the country they live in, so they will cast a vote for the party that they think will do the best for themselves, and they form part of the citizenship, so their voice is valid, as they want what is best in their views.

    This not allowing them to vote suggests that some parties allow prisoners better treatment than others... is this true? How could they treat a native of their country different to others? They need to allow all the people to vote. But what if the prisoners made up a huge minority of the people in the country, would their vote count then? If not they would petition the state and see that they are treated equally, otherwise it is discrimination, but, is this discrimination warrented? What could a majority of prisoners do to upset the country? And seeing as how the prisoners are in the minority, how can they sway the vote? Paying special attention to them is a waste of time, so they should be allowed to vote just like anyone else.

    What could influence their vote? A better future? Everyone wants a better future, so they would be a part of 'building' that better future along with everyone else... why exclude them from that? Fear that they could do something wrong? How is voting for anything wrong based on wanting a better future? So the parties could sell their ideas to them just like anyone else they wanted to sell them to, and as citizens they have a right to that better future. Seeing as how they will inherit it they should have a say too, right? How can you claim presidency over someone that wasn't allowed to vote? Removing the rights to vote from anyone is unjustified - everyone can vote, why can't they vote? Because they did something wrong a long time ago? They still pay taxes don't they? They are just like anyone else, except they can't vote for any party.

    If something is within the reach of everyone, and some are told they cannot reach it and are not allowed to reach it, doesn't that mean they are not a part of everyone? If they could make a vote for a better country, but are told they cannot because of their history, then what harm could they do? They could do some good, that is for sure, but what bad things could come of them voting? So, if there is no good reason why they can't vote, they chousl be able to vote, as they are not self destructive are they, and voting for a better country means that they will try to do just that.
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by DevilPup John View Post
    This idea came from another thread about voter registration.

    In some states in the US convicted felons do not have the right to vote.

    So this is my question to you (and depending how people respond... well we will have to see where it goes).

    What do you expects prisons to do?

    Should they rehabilitate? Change offenders into good citizens?

    Should they punish?

    Your thoughts please. If things go as I think they will, this should go somewhere.
    And:

    Quote Originally Posted by Allocutus View Post
    I disagree with everyone. I like disagreeing with everyone.

    Convicted felons are citizens who have been deprived of their freedom. I will briefly address the issue of rehabilitation as it has been raised by previous posters here:

    There are a number of purposes in sentencing. These are:

    1. Rehabilitation - ordering a sentence that will be conducive to the offender's ability to rehabilitate herself/himself and become a productive (or at least non-destructive) member of the community.

    2. General deterrence - this is to 'scare' other potential offenders against similar offending. A person who sees some conduct punished is arguably less likely to engage in that conduct himself.

    3. Specific deterrence - this is to 'scare' the offender herself/himself from reoffending.

    4. Denunciation - this is to demonstrate to the offender that the community does not tolerate his/her conduct.

    5. Just (fair) punishment. This is in effect an element of retribution.

    Rehabilitation is indeed one of the aspects of sentencing. Prisons should always have programs in place to attempt to facilitate rehabilitation of offenders.

    All that said, there is no reason why prisoners should not be able to vote. Their punishment (in all of the 5 senses) is imprisonment; loss of freedom. Why should they also be precluded from voting?

    NB. I do agree with Aspo on one point. Some people's makeup is such that they are beyond rehabilitation. She calls it genetic makeup. I would go further and say that our makeup is more than that as it also includes our experiences, how our brain reacts to situations, etc. I in fact believe (more than that, I am firmly convinced) that there is no free will at all and everything we do or do not do is due to our makeup. However, that is way beyond this topic. Suffice to say that, in the minimum, I agree with Aspo that at least some people cannot be rehabilitated as they're in effect predestined by their genetic makeup to be offenders. This raises a question, however. How can we attach moral culpability to someone who cannot stop herself/himself from offending no matter how much she/he would like to?

    Prisons are some of the most stupidest ideas humanity has ever come up with. At least, the version we claim that we're simultaneously rehabilitating criminals, punishing criminals and making them pay for their crimes, and making the world safer. Pick one.


    If prisons exist to make the world safer, then do the world a favor and start killing more criminals or send them to jail for life. Seriously. Pedophiles, most murderers, rapists, thugs, drug addicts and compulsive thieves we know are never, or almost never, going to "get better". So sticking them in a cage for 5-25 years, subjecting them to sexual/psychological abuse though out it, and then releasing them meaner than they were before they came to jail is asinine. If the world is to become safer, keep criminals who are beyond hope away from the general public.

    If prisons are supposed to rehabilitate people, then don't shove them in a goddamn cage for 5-25 years that is going to do nothing to make them more competent or responsible citizens. It's going to make them meaner; that's what jail does. It makes them meaner, less psychologically stable, and they now are willing to do a whole lot more not to get sent back to jail. If you believe that jail should be to rehabilitate, then send people to mental facilities, drug rehabilitation, work programs, or whatnot.

    If prisons should punish people, then you've found your system in America. You're going to subject a bunch of criminals to (in some cases possibly due) psychological, physical, and sexual abuse. They're going to be bored out of their minds for half the time and the rest of the time scared out of their wits. They are more than likely not going to enjoy a dammed bit of it, and they'll suffer greatly. That's punishment.



    The three are incompatible. Pick one. It annoys the f*cking sh*t out of me when people try to reconcile the three. The three are mutually incompatible. Pick one and petition your congressman, governors, and local political leaders to follow your prefered method. Just don't pretend like you can sit on the fence for any of these (outside of the cases where "making the world safer by killing people" and "punishing people for murder" meet together) or pretend like they are compatible. If you think jails should make the world safer, you're going to need to send a lot of people to jail for life and/or kill a lot of your citizens to effectively do what you want. If you think jails should rehabilitate people, then expect a lot of failure because a lot of people are not mentally curable. If you want prisons to punish people to take counters off of some universal "injustice" counter, then don't expect the world to be a safer place because you're just going to release them once they've "paid" for their crimes and they're not going to rehabilitated or anything resembling more functional.


    But for the love of god, just pick one, and have the intellectual fortitude and conviction to actually state what you want done and have it done effectually.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." --Voltaire

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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Thanks GP...

    Stole all my fun...

    Well I am not going to spend much time reading and responding to each individual post... and no offense but my time is much to precious to waste on that nonsense.

    So to sum this up as quickly as possible:

    It is a fact that most of our prison population is going to be released back into society, not just half, but most.

    The idea of totally isolating them (taking away the right to vote) seems asinine to me. These people WILL be coming back to society, taking away their civilian rights is just another way of pushing them away.

    Like GP Said, pick one. If you are going to punish them do it. Send them off never to return, because once you start punishing them the way our system does they will never be the same again. They will continue to come back.

    Some of them are beyond rehabilitation that is true.

    I have lost my train of thought here... I need to go eat and do something else before my mind explodes. Ill get back to this later.
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  18. #18
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by DevilPup John View Post
    Thanks GP...

    Stole all my fun...
    Typical GP, he does that all the time.

    Well I am not going to spend much time reading and responding to each individual post... and no offense but my time is much to precious to waste on that nonsense.
    That is a little bit unfair, seeing that we took the time to respond to your OP. Guess your time is more precious than most of ours'...

    So to sum this up as quickly as possible:

    It is a fact that most of our prison population is going to be released back into society, not just half, but most.
    Agree, but what about those who got LWOP and the DP? Surely there is no purpose in letting them vote? Or are they also released back into society?
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    Re: Convicted Felons

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldPhoenix View Post
    And:




    Prisons are some of the most stupidest ideas humanity has ever come up with. At least, the version we claim that we're simultaneously rehabilitating criminals, punishing criminals and making them pay for their crimes, and making the world safer. Pick one.


    If prisons exist to make the world safer, then do the world a favor and start killing more criminals or send them to jail for life. Seriously. Pedophiles, most murderers, rapists, thugs, drug addicts and compulsive thieves we know are never, or almost never, going to "get better". So sticking them in a cage for 5-25 years, subjecting them to sexual/psychological abuse though out it, and then releasing them meaner than they were before they came to jail is asinine. If the world is to become safer, keep criminals who are beyond hope away from the general public.

    If prisons are supposed to rehabilitate people, then don't shove them in a goddamn cage for 5-25 years that is going to do nothing to make them more competent or responsible citizens. It's going to make them meaner; that's what jail does. It makes them meaner, less psychologically stable, and they now are willing to do a whole lot more not to get sent back to jail. If you believe that jail should be to rehabilitate, then send people to mental facilities, drug rehabilitation, work programs, or whatnot.

    If prisons should punish people, then you've found your system in America. You're going to subject a bunch of criminals to (in some cases possibly due) psychological, physical, and sexual abuse. They're going to be bored out of their minds for half the time and the rest of the time scared out of their wits. They are more than likely not going to enjoy a dammed bit of it, and they'll suffer greatly. That's punishment.



    The three are incompatible. Pick one. It annoys the f*cking sh*t out of me when people try to reconcile the three. The three are mutually incompatible. Pick one and petition your congressman, governors, and local political leaders to follow your prefered method. Just don't pretend like you can sit on the fence for any of these (outside of the cases where "making the world safer by killing people" and "punishing people for murder" meet together) or pretend like they are compatible. If you think jails should make the world safer, you're going to need to send a lot of people to jail for life and/or kill a lot of your citizens to effectively do what you want. If you think jails should rehabilitate people, then expect a lot of failure because a lot of people are not mentally curable. If you want prisons to punish people to take counters off of some universal "injustice" counter, then don't expect the world to be a safer place because you're just going to release them once they've "paid" for their crimes and they're not going to rehabilitated or anything resembling more functional.


    But for the love of god, just pick one, and have the intellectual fortitude and conviction to actually state what you want done and have it done effectually.

    You're right in saying that the American prison system is a spectacular failure.


    I understand you're asking me to "pick one" of the three purposes of prisons that you have outlined. Then you urge me to have the intellectual fortitude and conviction to state what I have done....

    I have to confess I am confused. This thread is not about purposes of imprisonment, partuciularly in the context that you have just raised. This thread is about prisoners' rights to vote. My little rundown on sentencing principles (which do not just apply to imprisonment) was tangental and was just a response to what other people have said on those issues.

    As for what I want done, I have made it clear from the start. I want prisoners to have voting rights.
    "I am against religion because it teaches us to be satisfied with not understanding the world" - Richard Dawkins

    "If you could rationalize with Religious people there would be no more Religious people" -Gregory House

  20. #20
    ODN Community Regular

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    Re: Convicted Felons

    That is a little bit unfair, seeing that we took the time to respond to your OP. Guess your time is more precious than most of ours'...
    Yes, it is...

    Of course it is. And your time should be more precious than mine (to you). I have other more important things to do than read every single persons response and respond to it. I skimmed over them and got the general idea, and then made a general response. I only have a limited amount of time and attention to give. So I gave an equal amount to everyone.


    Agree, but what about those who got LWOP and the DP? Surely there is no purpose in letting them vote? Or are they also released back into society?
    Well they wont be released into society, so there's no problem there.
    Witty puns...

 

 
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