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  1. #1
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    Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes...rd-easter.html

    "Television station WHNT reported that teachers were informed that no activities related to or centered around any religious holiday would be allowed – in the interest of religious diversity."

    So, I looked up the word diversity because this sentence just didn't feel right. The definition is as follows:
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/diversity

    "noun, plural di·ver·si·ties. 1. the state or fact of being diverse; difference; unlikeness: diversity of opinion.
    2. variety; multiformity.
    3. a point of difference."



    Now, I get the school is looking to protect themselves from a law suit. I understand what they probably really mean is that if the hunt for eggs under the premise that it is as an Easter hunt, they'll get sued for breaching the first amendment. But, do they really have to bend over backwards to redefine language? There is nothing which adds diversity to these children's lives by omitting the word Easter from an egg hunt which every child knows is a Christian holiday tradition. By definition, the antonym of diversity is "single". So, if every child must refer to the egg hunt by omitting Easter, then isn't the school promoting singularity? Wouldn't diversity be allowing Christians to call the egg hunt an Easter egg hunt and letting non-Christian children refer to it by any other name (i.e. just an egg hunt)? Wouldn't that actually meet the criterion for diversity?

    Here is what pisses me off. Everyone knows the school is covering their asses. Instead of calling out the real issue (i.e. some a-hole parent complained), the school protects the single family and lies to all the other families. Furthermore, couching their decision behind this sort of language makes the decision appear altrusitic when it isn't. It looks to prevent the majority from being angry and taking an action which will restore their own values.

    I believe with all these issues, semantics/meaning is important and not valued enough by conservatives. We have allowed words like oppression, victim, and diversity to become real ideas and take meaning in our debates. I believe it is important to push back. Call b.s. when it shows up. Parents should be calling the school and asking them to retract their statment and replace it with a statement which does not look to hide the truth or obfusicate it. Once the truth is out in the open, then parents can take reasonable action which may provide a better outcome for their children.
    The U.S. is currently enduring a zombie apocalypse. However, in a strange twist, the zombie's are starving.

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  3. #2
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    IMO, schools ought to cater to the tax payers that fund them. This means that each region or locale will have different cultural traditions and those schools should be allowed to cater to the larger demographics or at the very least, allow those tax payers to decide whether or not they want those cultural traditions and values to be expressed or taught in that particular school.

    I'm completely fine with a public school celebrating Ramadan, Hanukkah, Easter, etc... so far as a) it's representative of its community and/or b) there is a majority favor of its tax payers to do so.

    I grew up having Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas programs (singing, playing instruments, skits/drama, etc...). I remember the entire class creating themed projects towards the holiday. None of that happens today (at least where I live in So Cal) other than 1 minor, independent project like a "hand turkey" for Thanksgiving. It's sad how bland we've gone. We should be celebrating cultural diversity, allowing children to learn the history and meaning of these different traditions and cultures that make up our rich, diverse, US culture.

    Instead, we must cater to whoever has the biggest mouth AND is the smallest minority because our culture in many places of the US has shifted towards "the minority is always right" philosophy (usually, the more liberal areas of the country).

    Instead of celebrating diversity, we've come to shun it like a bad word. It's pc to the extreme.
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  5. #3
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Its another great example of the truism that governmental expansion makes every decision a political one. Because these are state funded and supported school systems, every question related to them is, by necessity, a political question with all the ramifications that that implies. We cannot have a school that teaches only X opinion because it is being paid for by people who don't agree. We can't have people making their own choice on an issue because we must act collectively. This is a great example of the moral hazard inherent in collective action.
    "Suffering lies not with inequality, but with dependence." -Voltaire
    "Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.” -G.K. Chesterton
    Also, if you think I've overlooked your post please shoot me a PM, I'm not intentionally ignoring you.


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  7. #4
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Apokalupsis View Post
    IMO, schools ought to cater to the tax payers that fund them. This means that each region or locale will have different cultural traditions and those schools should be allowed to cater to the larger demographics or at the very least, allow those tax payers to decide whether or not they want those cultural traditions and values to be expressed or taught in that particular school.

    I'm completely fine with a public school celebrating Ramadan, Hanukkah, Easter, etc... so far as a) it's representative of its community and/or b) there is a majority favor of its tax payers to do so.

    I grew up having Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas programs (singing, playing instruments, skits/drama, etc...). I remember the entire class creating themed projects towards the holiday. None of that happens today (at least where I live in So Cal) other than 1 minor, independent project like a "hand turkey" for Thanksgiving. It's sad how bland we've gone. We should be celebrating cultural diversity, allowing children to learn the history and meaning of these different traditions and cultures that make up our rich, diverse, US culture.

    Instead, we must cater to whoever has the biggest mouth AND is the smallest minority because our culture in many places of the US has shifted towards "the minority is always right" philosophy (usually, the more liberal areas of the country).

    Instead of celebrating diversity, we've come to shun it like a bad word. It's pc to the extreme.
    I had much the same experience, except I was the minority. I didn't have the option of not singing about the baby Jesus in my public school even though I am Jewish. I believe that is the only thing I'd add what you have suggested. If someone does not want to participate in an event that is clearly about a specific religion or culture, than the person can opt out. Otherwise, I am in perfect agreeance with you Apok. What we have, as the OP noted is a singularity rather than diversity. So, either the clowns on the left or going to have to recant their tired phrase about how good diversity is, or they are going to have to somehow redefine diversity to mean something it isn't. I am guessing the latter.
    The U.S. is currently enduring a zombie apocalypse. However, in a strange twist, the zombie's are starving.

  8. #5
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    I absolutely agree with "opting out." I see nothing wrong with it whatsoever when it comes to programs or celebrations and the like. However, if it is a matter of curriculum (such as learning the history and traditions of a people or even religion) then I'd disagree.
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  9. #6
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Apokalupsis View Post
    I absolutely agree with "opting out." I see nothing wrong with it whatsoever when it comes to programs or celebrations and the like. However, if it is a matter of curriculum (such as learning the history and traditions of a people or even religion) then I'd disagree.
    I feel likewise. Curious that our resident lefties are so quiet. I should make it clear for those who arrive to this forum late, I am not really debating what the school should or shouldn't do in terms of policy. Rather, I am focusing on the language the school is using. My contention is that the school's language on this issue is problematic and serves to pacify the community rather than treat the community's needs.
    The U.S. is currently enduring a zombie apocalypse. However, in a strange twist, the zombie's are starving.

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  11. #7
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Obviously, here "religious diversity" means "elimination of any religious celebration," hijacking the definition of diversity for anti-religious ends. Rather than allowing teachers, parents and students to communally celebrate Christmas, Chanukah, Ramadan, etc., the dictatorship of relativism has simply commanded "No" to any such expression of religious belief in public life.

    I'm referring here to a quote by former Pope Benedict XVI (which Pope Francis has echoed):

    "We are building a dictatorship of relativism, that does not recognize anything as definitive and whose ultimate standard consists solely of one's own ego and desires."

    Benedict goes on: "A new intolerance is spreading, that is quite obvious. There are well-established standards of thinking that are supposed to be imposed on everyone. These are then announced in terms of so-called "negative tolerance". For instance, when people say that for the sake of negative tolerance [i.e. "not offending anyone"] there must be no crucifix in public buildings. With that we are basically experiencing the abolition of tolerance, for it means, after all, that religion, that the Christian faith is no longer allowed to express itself visibly."

    This idea of "negative tolerance," which of course is no tolerance at all, is being heavily pushed by those behind today's secularist, statist agenda.

  12. #8
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Nice OP, Ibelsd.

    Liberalism has become the crying child, and as much as the parent would like to ignore the crying child, it doesn't often have that luxury. Likewise, punishing the crying child becomes tedious after awhile. So eventually what happens is the crying child is appeased in some way and a compromise is made. Meanwhile, the other children that weren't crying get no such attention or special favors. The crying child has learned that by crying, you'll get some of what you want just to stop you from crying.

    These buzzwords of tolerance, diversity, discrimination, suppression, being offended, being disenfranchised, being judged, bigotry, homophobia, racism, sexism, etc., they amount to the crying child. Oh, and if you didn't notice, these ideals only operate in one direction. You tolerate the crying child, but the crying child doesn't have to tolerate you. I give you Chris Matthews, the poster crying child. I give you the Occupy movement, an organized group of crying children. I give you the atheist movement, the crying children who worship secularism. I give you the feminist movement, who thinks that they should be given special accommodations because they still pretend to be the poor victim of generations ago. I give you Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, Charlie Rangel... ever notice how they go out of their way to drum up things as racist that aren't even remotely close? Enough said.
    anything could be an illusion and we wouldn't know the difference... proof schmoof...

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  14. #9
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Xanadu Moo View Post
    Liberalism has become the crying child, and as much as the parent would like to ignore the crying child, it doesn't often have that luxury. Likewise, punishing the crying child becomes tedious after awhile. So eventually what happens is the crying child is appeased in some way and a compromise is made. Meanwhile, the other children that weren't crying get no such attention or special favors. The crying child has learned that by crying, you'll get some of what you want just to stop you from crying.
    I would add the bullying aspect to this. Take gay marriage as an issue. There are certainly logical debates one could have on the issue (regardless of which side you come down on), but those debates can't happen in general. If you would suggest that you don't support gay marriage you are immediately labeled as a homophobe, that you hate gay people and, surprisingly, now that you are a racist (the recent trend to say that those opposing gay marriage are the same people that opposed interracial marriage for example).

    They not only whine about the issue, they label anyone that disagrees with them hateful or evil.
    "Suffering lies not with inequality, but with dependence." -Voltaire
    "Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.” -G.K. Chesterton
    Also, if you think I've overlooked your post please shoot me a PM, I'm not intentionally ignoring you.


  15. #10
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibelsd View Post
    http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes...rd-easter.html

    "Television station WHNT reported that teachers were informed that no activities related to or centered around any religious holiday would be allowed – in the interest of religious diversity."

    So, I looked up the word diversity because this sentence just didn't feel right. The definition is as follows:
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/diversity

    "noun, plural di·ver·si·ties. 1. the state or fact of being diverse; difference; unlikeness: diversity of opinion.
    2. variety; multiformity.
    3. a point of difference."



    Now, I get the school is looking to protect themselves from a law suit. I understand what they probably really mean is that if the hunt for eggs under the premise that it is as an Easter hunt, they'll get sued for breaching the first amendment. But, do they really have to bend over backwards to redefine language? There is nothing which adds diversity to these children's lives by omitting the word Easter from an egg hunt which every child knows is a Christian holiday tradition. By definition, the antonym of diversity is "single". So, if every child must refer to the egg hunt by omitting Easter, then isn't the school promoting singularity? Wouldn't diversity be allowing Christians to call the egg hunt an Easter egg hunt and letting non-Christian children refer to it by any other name (i.e. just an egg hunt)? Wouldn't that actually meet the criterion for diversity?

    Here is what pisses me off. Everyone knows the school is covering their asses. Instead of calling out the real issue (i.e. some a-hole parent complained), the school protects the single family and lies to all the other families. Furthermore, couching their decision behind this sort of language makes the decision appear altrusitic when it isn't. It looks to prevent the majority from being angry and taking an action which will restore their own values.

    I believe with all these issues, semantics/meaning is important and not valued enough by conservatives. We have allowed words like oppression, victim, and diversity to become real ideas and take meaning in our debates. I believe it is important to push back. Call b.s. when it shows up. Parents should be calling the school and asking them to retract their statment and replace it with a statement which does not look to hide the truth or obfusicate it. Once the truth is out in the open, then parents can take reasonable action which may provide a better outcome for their children.
    I think by diversity, they mean that they want to treat all religions equally or not at all. Perhaps they don't have the funds or knowledge to celebrate all the religious holidays represented by their school population. So it is better not to have any celebrations at all. One poster suggested opting out but why should a minority group be made to feel even more excluded than they are probably already feeling?

    It does seem a little double-speak to say its diversity in religion when it's really meaning no religion at all. But perhaps it's just referring to letting religions do their own thing and not have to interfere with others.

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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibelsd View Post
    I feel likewise. Curious that our resident lefties are so quiet. I should make it clear for those who arrive to this forum late, I am not really debating what the school should or shouldn't do in terms of policy. Rather, I am focusing on the language the school is using. My contention is that the school's language on this issue is problematic and serves to pacify the community rather than treat the community's needs.
    The phrase "in the interest of religious diversity" is an acknowledgement of the diversity the students. I don't really see this as any new use of the word. The school is supporting religious diversity by delegating the task of religious education to individual families.

    If you just replace "in the interest of" with "in acknowledgement of" the whole things seems pretty standard. Any semantic issues rest there, not in use of the term "diversity"

  17. #12
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by JimJones8934 View Post
    I think by diversity, they mean that they want to treat all religions equally or not at all. Perhaps they don't have the funds or knowledge to celebrate all the religious holidays represented by their school population. So it is better not to have any celebrations at all. One poster suggested opting out but why should a minority group be made to feel even more excluded than they are probably already feeling?

    It does seem a little double-speak to say its diversity in religion when it's really meaning no religion at all. But perhaps it's just referring to letting religions do their own thing and not have to interfere with others.
    Without regard to whether it is better to let the majority freely exercise their religion or whether it is better for no religious displays at all, the point is that the school's policy in no way promotes diversity. Thank you for admitting this.

    ---------- Post added at 10:13 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:58 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by AuspiciousFist View Post
    The phrase "in the interest of religious diversity" is an acknowledgement of the diversity the students. I don't really see this as any new use of the word. The school is supporting religious diversity by delegating the task of religious education to individual families.

    If you just replace "in the interest of" with "in acknowledgement of" the whole things seems pretty standard. Any semantic issues rest there, not in use of the term "diversity"
    So, your premise is that the school spokeshole merely misspoke. Let me play along for a moment. What exactly does "in acknowledgement of diversity" mean? Are you implying that if the school allowed the use of the word Easter, that it would be akin to disbelieving diversity exists? Does diversity need to be acknowledged? Would a Muslim cease being Muslim if he participated in an Easter egg hunt?

    We could simply replace the school spokehole's entire sentence and actually represent what he means. Namely, some a-hole parent complained and now they run the risk of being sued. So, it is better to "acknowledge/show interest in" diversity even if the school's actions are completely contradictory to the concept of diversity. Why didn't the school dare say what they are really doing? If the school was so interested in diversity, whatever the meaning, why wait until a parent complains? Again, I contend that words matter. The school made an attempt to appear altruistic when there is really no evidence that it acted in an altruistic manner. Furthermore, this language is the type of language that tends (and is intended) to dissuade discussion or debate. It makes the parents who argue for using the word Easter look like insensitive jerks, or worse. It is akin to playing the race card because they are against welfare or calling someone homophobic because they oppose gay marriage. This type of language needs to be called out and the debate needs to be shifted if we wish to honestly discuss these issues as a society and within our communities.
    The U.S. is currently enduring a zombie apocalypse. However, in a strange twist, the zombie's are starving.

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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibelsd View Post

    So, your premise is that the school spokeshole merely misspoke. Let me play along for a moment. What exactly does "in acknowledgement of diversity" mean? Are you implying that if the school allowed the use of the word Easter, that it would be akin to disbelieving diversity exists? Does diversity need to be acknowledged? Would a Muslim cease being Muslim if he participated in an Easter egg hunt?

    We could simply replace the school spokehole's entire sentence and actually represent what he means. Namely, some a-hole parent complained and now they run the risk of being sued. So, it is better to "acknowledge/show interest in" diversity even if the school's actions are completely contradictory to the concept of diversity. Why didn't the school dare say what they are really doing? If the school was so interested in diversity, whatever the meaning, why wait until a parent complains? Again, I contend that words matter. The school made an attempt to appear altruistic when there is really no evidence that it acted in an altruistic manner. Furthermore, this language is the type of language that tends (and is intended) to dissuade discussion or debate. It makes the parents who argue for using the word Easter look like insensitive jerks, or worse. It is akin to playing the race card because they are against welfare or calling someone homophobic because they oppose gay marriage. This type of language needs to be called out and the debate needs to be shifted if we wish to honestly discuss these issues as a society and within our communities.
    I think you are being a bit unfair to the school involved. In the article you link to, the principal gives the statement that you seem to want ("We had in the past a parent to question us about some of the things we do here at school,” said Heritage Elementary School principal Lydia Davenport. “So we’re just trying to make sure we respect and honor everybody’s differences.”"). They aren't hiding the fact that a parent complained, they just don't seem to be making a big deal out of it.

    The situation seems to be that a parent complained about a religious celebration in school, the administrators agreed with the parent, there was a negotiation about how to be religiously-neutral without completely abandoning Easter traditions and the agreed upon changes were implemented. How is the school not trying to be altruistic here? It seems to me that you are just angry that the school isn't reacting to this parent's (not unreasonable) complaint in the way you would yourself.


    This is situation is in line with the logical progression of our culture. For generations people have observed the secularization of our cultural holidays, and this is simply an event on that trajectory. "Easter" is a word with a lot of important religious weight to a lot of people. To me it seems a lot more responsible and respectful (altruistic?) for us as a culture to separate our secular Spring Celebration (with the rabbits and eggs that have nothing to do with Jesus' resurrection) from the label "Easter." If there isn't any distance between the two, then the spiritual (Christian) concepts will be in danger of being trivialized and buried beneath American worship of Consumption.

    In other words, I think Christians, liberals, and anyone else concerned with the preservation of spiritual heritage/traditions should support the effort to separate public school education from spiritual holidays.

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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibelsd View Post
    Without regard to whether it is better to let the majority freely exercise their religion or whether it is better for no religious displays at all, the point is that the school's policy in no way promotes diversity. Thank you for admitting this.
    I'm with Auspicious Fist on this one - I don't think there is much here to argue about. I agreed with you that the use of the word is a little Orwellian but that is all so there's nothing to 'admit'.

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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    It is pretty absurd.

    I agree in principle that the state should not sponsor religious events. I however do not see Easter egg hunts as being a very religious event. Sure, it has the name Easter, which is indeed used by Christians in america (though not in most countries apparently), but that is about where the real connection to Christianity ends.

    Christian celebration of easter involves a lot of prayers and activities at church. The candy and eggs and baskets of toys and such are about as christian as santa clause. They do have pagan roots but so do the days of the Julian calendar and the names of the planets. Kids like rabbits and candy (eggs... well depends on the kid).

    Concerns about religion and separation of church and state should be limited to actual worship, veneration, and idolization and not extended to the nth degree for every derived cultural tradition with any connection to a faith modern or ancient. Real diversity allows for cultural flow and celebration, whatever it may be.

    On the whole, while there is a bit of a rising secular tide, most atheists don't care if kids do easter egg hunts in schools. The are however always a few individuals who take things way farther than is wise. I am to an extent glad that firebrands are out there keeping us honest, but I'd rather they don't actually win their battles.
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by sig
    Concerns about religion and separation of church and state should be limited to actual worship, veneration, and idolization and not extended to the nth degree for every derived cultural tradition with any connection to a faith modern or ancient. Real diversity allows for cultural flow and celebration, whatever it may be.
    Yes, but it is a cultural flow that happens organically through community interaction. A state-funded school that tends to focus on holidays with a certain religious history may actually thwart cultural exchange. It probably depends on the district, as the Christian connotations of Easter would probably be more keenly felt in a small town dominated by Christians than a New York public school.

    The way I see it, the secular aspects of Easter are a culturally enforced framework that various religions can employ. Christians can use it to entertain kids at Easter, Wiccans can use it for their Spring ceremonies and so on. However, it is pretty understandable that some faiths, or some people in those faiths, might have a problem with it. In those cases it is the public school district's responsibility to make an effort to find a middle ground.

    basically, like anything else, Easter celebrations in school aren't a problem until someone has a problem with it. That person then has an obligation to themselves, their family, and the culture they represent (however specific), to make their objections known in a respectful way. It is the public school's obligation to respectfully try to meet these people half way .

    More important than anything else, it is all of our responsibility not to vilify someone who complains. Doing so poses the real threat to diversity and undermines the best part of the American ideology.


    Quote Originally Posted by sig
    On the whole, while there is a bit of a rising secular tide, most atheists don't care if kids do easter egg hunts in schools. The are however always a few individuals who take things way farther than is wise. I am to an extent glad that firebrands are out there keeping us honest, but I'd rather they don't actually win their battles.
    to be fair, the article doesn't say if it was an atheist who complained or if it was a member of another religion.

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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibelsd
    I didn't have the option of not singing about the baby Jesus in my public school even though I am Jewish.
    That's really unfortunate. Unless the memory's too painful to talk about, I'd been interested in learning how your public school forced you to sing about baby Jesus?



    Quote Originally Posted by Apok
    I'm completely fine with a public school celebrating Ramadan, Hanukkah, Easter, etc... so far as a) it's representative of its community and/or b) there is a majority favor of its tax payers to do so.
    Ramadan is an obligation practiced by those truly devoted to the concept of "The Oneness of God." For this reason, it's difficult to imagine that many Christian parents who accept the Doctrine of the Trinity would want their children celebrating Ramadan just because the majority of the students at that school were Muslim.

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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by Rodriguez View Post
    Ramadan is an obligation practiced by those truly devoted to the concept of "The Oneness of God." For this reason, it's difficult to imagine that many Christian parents who accept the Doctrine of the Trinity would want their children celebrating Ramadan just because the majority of the students at that school were Muslim.
    That's just plain silly, if you think that the oneness of God is what Christians would take issue with if they had to celebrate Ramadan. Just because the oneness of the trinity doesn't make sense to you, does not mean that Christians don't believe that. It's as if you're being willfully ignorant. You know that Trinitarians full-heartedly believe that God is one.

    But of course this is more of an aside, sorry guys. I really don't see how a bunny and some eggs could possibly be considered a celebration of Christian ideas. Do you really think that Muslim kids would even have the slightest idea that it's originally a Christian holiday, if they weren't told so?
    There is no wealth like knowledge, no poverty like ignorance.
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    You apparently have a serious misunderstanding about the concept of the *"Oneness of God" as it is understood by Islam. The number of entities that compose the thing called "God" is perhaps the biggest difference between Islam and Christianity. Islam says that Jesus is not God but is only a messenger of God and is not even the most important messenger of God, at that; the most important messenger of God from an Islamic point-of-view is Muhammad.

    You really believe that most Christian parents would not have a problem with their children celebrating the date on which the Holy Qu'ran was sent to Muhammad, the chief messenger from God and Jesus' superior?

    *"One important difference between the presentations of God in the Qur’an and the New Testament, at least according to the most popular understanding of the latter, is that the God of the Qur’an is one whereas the God of the New Testament is a unity. Allah is not a number of persons in one, one person in multiple manifestations, one being in different aspects, one in more than one mode, or any such designations that Christianity developed. All that can be said about Him is that He is one. His oneness cannot be broken down into any smaller units or different aspects or forms." -- http://www.quranicstudies.com/quran/...-in-the-quran/

  28. #20
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    Re: Die, Die, Die, Diversity

    Quote Originally Posted by AuspiciousFist View Post
    I think you are being a bit unfair to the school involved. In the article you link to, the principal gives the statement that you seem to want ("We had in the past a parent to question us about some of the things we do here at school,” said Heritage Elementary School principal Lydia Davenport. “So we’re just trying to make sure we respect and honor everybody’s differences.”"). They aren't hiding the fact that a parent complained, they just don't seem to be making a big deal out of it.
    And he should have stopped there. They attempted to minimize the whining parent's involvement in the decision. Additionally, there is no indication the school sought the opinion of the other parents. Yet, the school tried to claim the decision was about diversity. No. It was about possible litigation.

    Quote Originally Posted by AuspiciousFist View Post
    The situation seems to be that a parent complained about a religious celebration in school, the administrators agreed with the parent, there was a negotiation about how to be religiously-neutral without completely abandoning Easter traditions and the agreed upon changes were implemented. How is the school not trying to be altruistic here? It seems to me that you are just angry that the school isn't reacting to this parent's (not unreasonable) complaint in the way you would yourself.
    I am not angry. Please don't insinuate I am making an emotional argument here in an attempt to belittle my point of view. I did not specifically in the OP make an argument about what should have been done with the Easter egg hunt. My argument is solely about the language used by the school administration. Appeasing a single parent without consulting any other parents and reacting to the complaints of a single parent and THEN claiming they are acting in an effort towards diversity is disingenuous. Again, I'll ask the simple question. If the school's interest was in diversity, why wait until a parent complained? Is your claim that the school administration had no idea that not every single student celebrated Easter until a parent complained? Call me incredulous.

    Quote Originally Posted by AuspiciousFist View Post
    This is situation is in line with the logical progression of our culture. For generations people have observed the secularization of our cultural holidays, and this is simply an event on that trajectory. "Easter" is a word with a lot of important religious weight to a lot of people. To me it seems a lot more responsible and respectful (altruistic?) for us as a culture to separate our secular Spring Celebration (with the rabbits and eggs that have nothing to do with Jesus' resurrection) from the label "Easter." If there isn't any distance between the two, then the spiritual (Christian) concepts will be in danger of being trivialized and buried beneath American worship of Consumption.

    In other words, I think Christians, liberals, and anyone else concerned with the preservation of spiritual heritage/traditions should support the effort to separate public school education from spiritual holidays.
    I'll leave such decisions up to the Christians. Not being a Christian, I am not about to claim I know what is best for the religion. What I do claim to know is when someone is offering b.s. The school administration is guilty of this charge.

    ---------- Post added at 12:53 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:51 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by JimJones8934 View Post
    I agreed with you that the use of the word is a little Orwellian but that is all so there's nothing to 'admit'.
    That is the whole claim of the OP. This is what you admitted to.
    The U.S. is currently enduring a zombie apocalypse. However, in a strange twist, the zombie's are starving.

 

 
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