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  1. #1
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    Top 100 People of the Millenium

    I'm not sure exactly how old this is (or isn't), but at some point, LIFE magazine compiled a list of what they believe comprises the top 100 people of the millenium. They have them ranked in order of importance, but other than that, I've absolutely no idea what their criteria included.

    Here's the link: http://www.life.com/Life/millennium/people/01.html

    And here's the list:

    1. THOMAS EDISON
    2.CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
    3. MARTIN LUTHER
    4. GALILEO GALILEI
    5. LEONARDO DA VINCI
    6. ISAAC NEWTON
    7. FERDINAND MAGELLAN
    8. LOUIS PASTEUR
    9. CHARLES DARWIN
    10. THOMAS JEFFERSON
    11. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
    12. NAPOLEON BONAPARTE
    13. ADOLF HITLER
    14. ZHENG HE
    15. HENRY FORD
    16. SIGMUND FREUD
    17. RICHARD ARKWRIGHT
    18. KARL MARX
    19. NICOLAUS COPERNICUS
    20. ORVILLE & WILBUR WRIGHT
    21. ALBERT EINSTEIN
    22. MOHANDAS GANDHI
    23. KUBLAI KHAN
    24. JAMES MADISON
    25. SIMON BOLIVAR
    26. MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT
    27. GUGLIELMO MARCONI
    28. MAO ZEDONG
    29. VLADIMIR LENIN
    30. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.
    31. ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL
    32. RENE DESCARTES
    33. LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
    34. THOMAS AQUINAS
    35. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
    36. MICHELANGELO
    37. VASCO DA GAMA
    38. SULEYMAN THE MAGNIFICENT
    39. SAMUEL F.B. MORSE
    40. JOHN CALVIN
    41. FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
    42. HERNAN CORTES
    43. JOSEPH LISTER
    44. IBN BATTUTA
    45. ZHU XI
    46. GREGOR MENDEL
    47. JOHN LOCKE
    48. AKBAR
    49. MARCO POLO
    50. DANTE ALIGHIERI
    51. JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER
    52. JEAN-JACQUES ROUSSEAU
    53. NIELS BOHR
    54. JOAN OF ARC
    55. FREDERICK DOUGLASS
    56. LOUIS XIV
    57. NIKOLA TESLA
    58. IMMANUEL KANT
    59. FAN KUAN
    60. OTTO VON BISMARCK
    61. WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR
    62. GUIDO OF AREZZ
    63. JOHN HARRISON
    64. POPE INNOCENT III
    65. HIRAM MAXIM
    66. JANE ADDAMS
    67. CAO XUEQIN
    68 MATTEO RICCI
    69. LOUIS ARMSTRONG
    70. MICHAEL FARADAY
    71. IBN-SINA
    72. SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR
    73. JALAL AD-DIN AR-RUMI
    74. ADAM SMITH
    75. MARIE CURIE
    76. ANDREA PALLADIO
    77. PETER THE GREAT
    78. PABLO PICASSO
    79. LOUIS JACQUES MANDE DAGUERRE
    80. ANTOINE-LAURENT LAVOISIER
    81. PHINEAS T. BARNUM
    82. EDWIN HUBBLE
    83. SUSAN B. ANTHONY
    84. RAPHAEL
    85. HELEN KELLER
    86. HOKUSAI
    87. THEODOR HERZL
    88. ELIZABETH I
    89 CLAUDIO MONTEVERDI
    90. WALT DISNEY
    91. NELSON MANDELA
    92. ROGER BANNISTER
    93. LEO TOLSTOY
    94. JOHN VON NEUMANN
    95. SANTIAGO RAMON Y CAJAL
    96. JACQUES COUSTEAU
    97. CATHERINE DE MEDICIS
    98. IBN-KHALDUN
    99. KWAME NKRUMAH
    100. CAROLUS LINNAEUS


    Agree? Disagree? See anyone you think definitely should NOT be on that list? Why? Thinking of anyone that maybe should have been included? Why?

    I came across this a few days ago while I was doing a research paper, read through it, and found myself stumped about a few of them (as in, why were they chosen??). Figured I'd bring it here...
    Judge of a man by his questions rather than by his answers.--Voltaire

  2. #2
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Any list must be subjective and open to challenge. I could for instance argue that Alexander Fleming, John Sheehan and Andrew J Moyer, in discovering and then synthesising and mass producing Penicillin and pioneering modern antibiotics have had a far greater impact on humanity as a whole than Helen Keller, worthy as her achievements most certainly were. (Without penicillin I would be dead, my mother would have died more than 30 years before she did; and I strongly suspect than most ODNers owe their current quality of life to antibiotics as well!)

    Also, it could be well argued that Winston Churchill in standing up to Hitler's Third Reich and seeing off the defeatists and appeasers among the British government influenced the shape and destiny of billions of lives. Hitler may well have been first to explode the Atomic bomb and his A3, A4 and progressions super rockets could have landed them on New York and Washington and elsewhere if Uncle Sam didn't stay quiet.

    How about Frank Whittle? He pioneered the idea of jet propulsion in aircraft just after the First World War. If the British government had taken him up on the idea and backed him with money, the RAF would probably been equipped with 600-700 mph fighters and bombers in time to knock seven shades of the brown stuff out of the Luftwaffe and Panzer attacks into France in World War Two. It is also likely that the Japanese may have reflected longer and harder about attacking Western interests in the Far East and the Pacific as a consequence.
    As it was the whole US and much of Russian jet powered aviation owe their advent to Gloster Whittle jet engines given free gratis to them by the British government early (Russians - later) in the war. The German development of the jet engine was more problematic than Whittle's more reliable propulsion unit. The Me262's technical hiccups led to accidents and malfunctions killing more of its pilots than through Allied action.


    Late in 1943, when the first turbojet engine was brought to the Cleveland laboratory, the entire subject of aircraft jet propulsion was so secret that only eight members of the laboratory staff were aware that the British and the Germans had actually flown aircraft powered by this radically new type of engine. Ben Pinkel, Chief of the Thermodynamics Division, recalled that he and seven other members of his division were summoned to the Administration Building to a special meeting with Ray Sharp and Colonel Donald Keirn of Wright Field. They were sworn to secrecy and told the remarkable story of how the United States had obtained a valuable piece of technology from the British-the plans for the Whittle turbojet engine.

    Keirn reported that in April 1941 General Arnold had learned during a visit to England of the development of a turbojet engine by Air Commodore Frank Whittle. At a meeting at Lord Beaverbrook's estate outside London, Arnold was surprised when his host, Churchill's minister of aircraft production and one of his most intimate advisors, turned to him and said, "What would you do if Churchill were hung and the rest of us in hiding in Scotland or being run over by the Germans, what would the people in American do? We are against the mightiest army the world has ever seen". Those present at the meeting agreed that Germany could invade England "anytime she was willing to make the sacrifice". This was the context in which Great Britain agreed to turn over the plans for the Whittle turbojet engine, provided utmost secrecy were maintained and a strictly limited number of persons were involved in its development. Arnold personally inspected the Whittle engine several weeks before its first flight and arranged to have General Electric's Supercharger Division at West Lynn, Mass., take on the American development of Whittle's prototype. Arnold selected Bell Aircraft of Buffalo, N.Y., to work concurrently on an airframe for a fighter, or pursuit-type aircraft.

    Arnold dispatched Keirn to England in August. He returned two months later with the plans for the Whittle W2B (an improvement of the original model), and an actual engine, the W1X. In addition to the plans and the engine itself, Keirn arranged to bring, to the United States one of Whittle's engineers and several technicians. Frank Whittle himself, the new engine's designer, visited the project during the time of intense development at General Electric's Supercharger Division at West Lynn, Mass. So new was the concept of a compressor-turbine combination propelling an airplane that, even with the plans and the reassembled engine, the supercharger experts remained skeptical. The British engineer recalled that "until we pushed the button and showed this thing running, the Americans wouldn't believe it would work". The General Electric group succeeded in translating the British specifications and produced, not without difficulty, an American copy of the Whittle engine.

    Arnold's selection of the General Electric Supercharger Division was no coincidence. In 1917, at a time when there was a general lack of interest in superchargers, Sanford Moss pioneered the development of a turbo supercharger, a turbine that utilized the waste gases in the engine exhaust, a concept first advanced by the Frenchman Auguste Rateau. At General Electric's West Lynn Plant this work continued under Army sponsorship until Moss retired in 1937. Part of the success of the General Electric turbo supercharger must be attributed to the development of materials for the turbine. Special alloys, such as Hastelloy B for the turbine blades, Timkin alloy, and later Vitallium for the turbine disks, enabled the turbine to withstand the extreme temperatures of the gases that passed through it.

    Colonel Edwin R. Page, Chief of the Power Plant Branch at Wright Field from 1926 to 1932, played an important role in encouraging Moss's work. Page calmly kept faith, despite what appeared to be an enormous waste of government funds, while turbines at General Electric exploded to the right and left of him. Because of his association with the development of General Electric's supercharger, the Army called on Colonel Page to nurture the relationship between General Electric and the fledgling NACA laboratory in Cleveland. He was appointed the laboratory's first Army liaison officer in May 1943.

    So secret was the development of the Whittle engine that only after the classification of the project was downgraded from "super-secret" to "secret" early in the summer of 1943 was Keirn allowed to inform the NACA of this important project-over two years after Arnold's visit to England. Keirn furnished the select group at the meeting in Sharp's office with a set of plans by General Electric for a jet Propulsion Static Test Laboratory, which was begun in July. Pinkel picked Kervork K. Nahigyan to head the new jet Propulsion Section.

    In September contractors had hastily completed an inconspicuous one-story building at the Cleveland laboratory. It was surrounded by a barbed wire fence at the edge of the airport's runway. A heavily guarded truck delivered the General Electric I-A for testing. The Static Test Laboratory consisted of spin pits lined with wood to protect workers from the dangers of blades flying off in all directions when engine compressors reached their limits during endurance testing. The secret work carried on in this modest structure, set apart from the carefully designed permanent laboratory buildings for the investigation of the piston engine-would, after the war, become the major effort of the entire laboratory.

    If the success of the Whittle engine was news to the group in Sharp's office, the jet propulsion concept was not. Pinkel and Nahigyan had assisted work at Langley on a jet propulsion device, inspired and directed by one of the NACAs outstanding aerodynamicists, Eastman Jacobs. The Army had unceremoniously canceled this project, the previous February.

    Before World War II, many experts throughout the world shared the assumption that better aircraft engines would result from small improvements of the components of the piston or reciprocating engine. Because the aircraft engine was an adaptation of the automobile engine, radical innovations were expected to appear first in the automobile engine. Roy Fedden, then an engineer for the Bristol Aeroplane Company, wrote in an article ironically titled, "Next Decade's Aero Engines Will Be Advanced But Not Radical published in the Transactions of the Society of Automotive Engineers in 1933: "I do not anticipate any radical changes in the type of four-cycle internal-combustion engine as used today. When the present form of gasoline engine is superceded by a radically different power unit, it seems logical that this development will most probably be accepted first in the automotive field before it is introduced into aircraft". Fedden's prediction was wide of the mark, for it was precisely Whittle's independence from the automotive background of traditional power plant experts that enabled him to seek a new engine uniquely suited for flight.

    In 1940 the sections within Langley's Power Plants Division reflected the conventional, incremental approach to the reciprocating engine. Unconventional power plants, radically new means of aircraft propulsion, had no place in the research of the division. Typical of the evolutionary rather than revolutionary, approach to engine development during the 1930s was the study of the fin geometry necessary to cool individual cylinders. NACA research suggested methods to improve the baffles and cylinder, shrouds to direct air around the cylinder for better cooling. One of the important reports issued by the NACA in 1939 concerned a method for predicting how much engine temperatures would fluctuate as the ambient air temperature changed. Cylinders from seven engine types were compared to establish this prediction method.

    The architects of the turbojet revolution, however, did not inherit the evolutionary approach of automotive engineers. Whittle and Hans von Ohain (who developed a turbojet independently in Germany) were able to look at aircraft propulsion with a freshness lacking among the engine experts in Europe and the United States. The positive qualities of flying the gas turbine made up for the deficiencies observed in stationary industrial turbines. Whittle wrote: "There seemed to be a curious tendency to take it for granted that the low efficiencies of turbines and compressors commonly cited were inevitable. I did not share the prevalent pessimism because I was convinced that big improvements in these efficiencies were possible, and, in the application of jet propulsion to aircraft, I realized that there were certain favorable factors not present in other applications". The first positive factor that he singled out was that low temperatures at high altitudes actually made the engine more efficient. More energy was available to power the airplane. Second, Whittle thought the forward speed of the aircraft created a ram effect, which increased the efficiency of the compressor; third, only a portion of the energy released into the turbine had to be used to drive the compressor-the rest could be used for propulsive thrust. These were the criteria of an engineer-test pilot. Although Whittle also had a strong background in aerodynamics, it did not play a significant role in his early thinking.
    Last edited by FruitandNut; December 16th, 2005 at 05:29 AM.
    "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." - Anais Nin.
    Emitte lucem et veritatem - Send out light and truth.
    'Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt' - Julius Caesar (rough translation, 'Men will think what they want to think')
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  3. #3
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Off the top of my head, I would dispute Christopher Columbus as #3. It's not like America was hard to find; it would have been found eventually (by Europe, that is. It was found considerably before that by Native Americans and Vikings).

    Let's see... I don't think Helen Keller deserves to be up there. She certainly overcame some huge obstacles, and went on to lead a rewarding life, but didn't really accomplish a whole lot more than most normal people. She certainly shouldn't trump Walt Disney.

    And finally, I really don't think that Magellen should be so close to the top. I'd put him 80-100 or so. He didn't really discover anything, an it was already known that the world was round. All he did was confirm it.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    69. LOUIS ARMSTRONG

    What? Are we talking about the trumpet-playing jaz singing Louis Armstrong? 'What a wonderful world' Louis Armstrong?

    What about Neil Armstrong? What about the space program? Did I miss someone on the list? In my mind, LEAVING THE PLANET was one of the big achievements of mankind in the last 1000 years.

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Zhav - ref. the space programme, it is ironic that the guy who led the development of the 'America Rocket' to bombard America with, who developed the V1 and V2, and who presided over slave labourers; would end up leading the rocket research into the Apollo programme.
    "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." - Anais Nin.
    Emitte lucem et veritatem - Send out light and truth.
    'Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt' - Julius Caesar (rough translation, 'Men will think what they want to think')
    Kill my boss? Do I dare live out the American dream? - Homer Simpson.

  6. #6
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    I think it's ridiculous that people like Edison, Columbus and Jefferson would be in the top 10. Jefferson in particular; in the scope of 1000 years of humanity the rebellion of a few British colonies is nothing. Absolutely and utterly insignificant.

  7. #7
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Quote Originally Posted by mog
    I think it's ridiculous that people like Edison, Columbus and Jefferson would be in the top 10. Jefferson in particular; in the scope of 1000 years of humanity the rebellion of a few British colonies is nothing. Absolutely and utterly insignificant.
    LOL

    You're just joking, right?

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Quote Originally Posted by mog
    Jefferson in particular; in the scope of 1000 years of humanity the rebellion of a few British colonies is nothing. Absolutely and utterly insignificant.
    OOhhhh I have a bunch of angry Virginians that would kill you for making such a remark about Mr.Jefferson. He was VERY accomplished. Jefferson was a scholar, a farmer, a diplomat, a president, naturalist, meteorologist, paleontologist, architect, musician (violin), botanist, Native American collector & purchased Louisiana Territory.He was also a philosopher, who liked to dabble in , astronomy, and geology. He founded UVA. And if authoring such things as the Declaration of Independence and the Statute of Virginia for religious freedom are not great accomplishments, I'd like to know in your opinion, what is?.
    He was also a great contributor of bi-racial children.

  9. #9
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Where the hell is Ben Franklin? If we can give a shout out to Hitler, what about good ole Benny..He deserves some props...Also missing David Hasselhoff...What a shame.

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Quote Originally Posted by FruitandNut
    Any list must be . . . blah blah blah . . . early thinking.

    Did you seriously type all that up in 23 minutes?! And that's assuming you saw the topic the instant it was posted as well

    Did you copy it from somewhere? I mean damn. If you came up with that all on your own in that short a time . . . fizzuck. That's impressive.

  11. #11
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Quote Originally Posted by Daddaluma
    Did you seriously type all that up in 23 minutes?! And that's assuming you saw the topic the instant it was posted as well

    Did you copy it from somewhere? I mean damn. If you came up with that all on your own in that short a time . . . fizzuck. That's impressive.
    He copied part of it from this, or at least a common source:
    http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4306/ch3.htm
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    64. POPE INNOCENT III - is this a relative of yours Mrs Innocent?

    From the top ten events list - how is Gutenberg printing the Bible #1 - I don't get it - his name is not even on the top 100 people list

    #10 | 1117
    THE COMPASS GOES TO SEA

    #9 | 1933
    HITLER COMES TO POWER
    #8 | 1776
    A DECLARATION TO THE WORLD
    #7 | c.1100
    CHINA DEVELOPS GUNPOWDER WEAPONS
    #6 | 1882
    THE GERM THEORY OF DISEASE:
    #5 | 1610
    GALILEO SEES THE MOONS OF JUPITER, AND THE EARTH MOVES
    #4 | 1769
    THE MACHINE AGE GEARS UP
    #3 | 1517
    LUTHER KNOCKS DOWN THE DOOR
    #2 | 1492
    A GLOBAL CIVILIZATION
    #1 | 1455

    GUTENBERG PRINTS THE BIBLE
    While laughing at others stupidity, you may want to contemplate your own comedic talents. (link)
    Disclaimer: This information is being provided for informational, educational, and entertainment purposes only.

  13. #13
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Quote Originally Posted by Neverending
    He copied part of it from this, or at least a common source:
    http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4306/ch3.htm
    Got 'diverted'/'distracted' before I stuck up the ref. which actually from another site. I knew the basics of the story. All the rest was mine own thoughts!

    Snoops - As an addendum to the compass, the chronometer/sea watch allowed much more accurate and safer journeys across oceans. John Harrison's H4 chronometer was the first easily portable and reliable chronometer that permitted both latitude AND longitude to be easily and quickly calculated.

    http://home.att.net/~agligani/navigation/history.htm
    Last edited by FruitandNut; December 16th, 2005 at 08:55 AM.
    "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." - Anais Nin.
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    'Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt' - Julius Caesar (rough translation, 'Men will think what they want to think')
    Kill my boss? Do I dare live out the American dream? - Homer Simpson.

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    ... a few more years down the road .... #1 GW Bush - the man who perpetuated the modern Armagedon theory by invading Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, N.Korea and Iran. #2 Fruit & Nut for rediscovering the H4 Chronometer.
    While laughing at others stupidity, you may want to contemplate your own comedic talents. (link)
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Where is George Washington? The man who rejected becoming king, after miraculously leading the American Revolution through dire circumstances, and thus initiated the democratic tradition in the world doesn't get a slot anywhere in that 100?

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    I can't believe that Gutenberg didn't make the list. He should be #1, or at least within the top five, when you consider the effect which the printing press had on the world.

    I also think that Newton should have been ranked a bit higher. I fail to see how the most influential and important physicist of all time somehow fell behind Galileo.

    And despite the obvious importance of the works of Edison, I don't see how he managed to snag #1. IMO, Gutenberg's work has been so much more important.
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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    I don't think Walt Disney should be on that list, maybe he did a lot of amazing things that I just don't care about. Helen Keller shouldn't be on the list, and if it's the Louis Armstrong that Zhav referenced then um, no he needs to be kicked off the list also. Susan B. Anthony should be higher on that list.
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." ~Bertrand Russell

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    Quote Originally Posted by SnoopCitySid
    From the top ten events list - how is Gutenberg printing the Bible #1 - I don't get it - his name is not even on the top 100 people list
    A while ago the History Channel did a list of the top 30 most influential people of the millenium, and Gutenberg was number 1 for inventing the printing press, with Newton a close second. In my opinion it was a far better and more considered list than Life magazine's. Perhaps Life were using different criteria.


    30 Beethoven
    29 Henry Ford S
    28 J. S. Bach
    27 Napoleon
    26 Mozart
    25 James Watt
    24 St. Thomas
    23 Lincoln
    22 Genghis Khan
    21 Washington



    20 Adam Smith
    19 Michelangelo
    18 John Locke
    17 Gandhi
    16 Hitler
    15 Jefferson
    14 Edison
    13 Pasteur S
    12 Freud
    11 Leonardo


    10 Galileo
    9 Copernicus
    8 Einstein
    7 Marx
    6 Columbus
    5 Shakespeare
    4 Darwin
    3 Luther
    2 Newton
    1 Gutenberg


    Quote Originally Posted by tinkerbell
    OOhhhh I have a bunch of angry Virginians that would kill you for making such a remark about Mr.Jefferson.
    Let's look at Life's blurb on Jefferson:
    Were it not for his mind and his pen, the world might have witnessed one more bloody revolution signifying nothing.
    There have been plenty of bloody revolutions signifying nothing throughout the millenium, one more would simply not have been a big deal.
    A lawyer by trade, a pioneer of American architecture, a president who spurred westward expansion, a slave owner who opposed slavery, Thomas Jefferson embodied many of the aspirations of a newborn nation.
    He opposed slavery, but did his influence have any effect? Certainly in the US, which abolished slavery in 1865, but the British abolitionists were far more influential since in 1807 Parliament passed the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act and in 1833 the Slavery Abolition Act which freed every slave in the entire British Empire. The US was lagging in terms of freeing slaves, not leading.
    It was a self-evident truth, wrote the 33-year-old Virginian, "that all Men are created equal." Natural law, the right to "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness," became the New World blueprint. It remains an alluring goal for democracies around the world.
    Jefferson himself said that the purpose of the declaration of independence was "not to find out new principles, or new arguments, never before thought of . . . but to place before mankind the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent, and to justify ourselves in the independent stand we are compelled to take."

    The ideas were not new, and drew heavily on the writings of John Locke among others (#47 on the Life list, #18 on the History Channel list), in particular his Two Treatises of Government written in 1689. Also, the Dutch Republic's Oath of Abjuration in the 16th century and the 14th century Scottish Declaration of Arbroath were large influences.

    Quote Originally Posted by tinkerbell
    And if authoring such things as the Declaration of Independence and the Statute of Virginia for religious freedom are not great accomplishments, I'd like to know in your opinion, what is?
    I would say that the works of the scholars from which people like Jefferson drew ideas and rephrased them to fit the American context deserve to be considered greater accomplishments. Jefferson was clearly a talented man, and an influential founding father of the US, but his talent for things you mentioned like architecture, farming and geology did not change the world.

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    I still don't understand why these lists have Jefferson and Lincoln but not Washington. If it were not for Washington's courageous and prudent actions, there would be no America for Jefferson to shape and Lincoln to save. Also, if Hitler, why not Roosevelt? If not for Roosevelt's leadership, the U.S. probably would not have recovered from the Great Depression in time to enter World War II, and then lead the Allies, along with Britain, to win it. Although I realize the list spans a thousand years, and more than one U.S. president is probably unwarranted, I think both lists lack balance.

  20. #20
    ODN Community Regular

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    Re: Top 100 People of the Millenium

    How about the Russian Lt. Colonel Stanislav Petrov who refused to accept that the US had launched a nuclear strike, in spite of what his computers were telling him?????
    He was not scheduled to be on duty, it is very possible that the guy who should have been on duty may have launched a 'retaliatory' strike against the States and Western Europe thus triggering the deaths of billions of people in a WWIII nuke exchange!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanislav_Petrov

    Far from appearing grateful, his 'superiors' interrogated him and considered him 'unreliable'!
    Last edited by FruitandNut; December 17th, 2005 at 02:29 AM.
    "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." - Anais Nin.
    Emitte lucem et veritatem - Send out light and truth.
    'Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt' - Julius Caesar (rough translation, 'Men will think what they want to think')
    Kill my boss? Do I dare live out the American dream? - Homer Simpson.

 

 
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