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  1. #1
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    I don't understand :cry:

    Compensation law of mortality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    What the hell does this mean? It seems to be a key point in reliability theory's plausiblity as the means for aging, but I can't understand what's being expressed.
    Apparently, something emperical went against theory. That's all I've gleaned. Help would be appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    It means some people will live longer than others; or some people will die sooner than others. Either way, your going to die so it all evens out.

    I don't understand it either.
    While laughing at others stupidity, you may want to contemplate your own comedic talents. (link)
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  3. #3
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    Seems simple to me, in all but the most sophisticated of societies (which don't really yet exist), a large population density can lead to many problems - food supply, tensions and fighting, mental stress and breakdown, disease, epidemics, accidents etc. A less dense population faces less competition.

    The older brain has 'been there', 'done it', and got the 'T-shirt' - they tend to be more accepting of the 'human condition' and that on that level nothing changes much. Younger folks are impatient to change things, but often don't realise that human nature, taken as a collective doesn't change much, although some of the trappings might.
    Last edited by FruitandNut; April 22nd, 2007 at 05:12 AM.
    "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." - Anais Nin.
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  4. #4
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    Quote Originally Posted by FruitandNut View Post
    Seems simple to me, in all but the most sophisticated of societies (which don't really yet exist), a large population density can lead to many problems - food supply, tensions and fighting, mental stress and breakdown, disease, epidemics, accidents etc. A less dense population faces less competition.
    I'm sorry, I don't understand this to a higher degree then the article itself.
    Get off your pony! Explain with little-people words

    Quote Originally Posted by FruitandNut View Post
    The older brain has 'been there', 'done it', and got the 'T-shirt' - they tend to be more accepting of the 'human condition' and that on that level nothing changes much. Younger folks are impatient to change things, but often don't realise that human nature, taken as a collective doesn't change much, although some of the trappings might.
    Look up transhumanism mr.fruit.
    I do not know how a society will behave when it can alter it's fundemental hardwiring, but I can tell you this. It will be a far cry from we we are today.

  5. #5
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    It says, basically, that the death rates among young people differ widely between societies, while the death rates of old people are similar for most societies. Or at least that's what I got out of it.
    Freedom is you choosing for yourself. Law is the government choosing for you. The two are opposites.

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  6. #6
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    I would like to see some documentary evidence for this "law". I always thought people in developed, "advantaged" societies tended to live longer because of better healthcare.
    Trendem

  7. #7
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    Quote Originally Posted by Castle View Post
    It says, basically, that the death rates among young people differ widely between societies, while the death rates of old people are similar for most societies. Or at least that's what I got out of it.
    That seems the most likely, thanks for explaining.

    I would like to see how this in any way colloberates the reliability theorm however!
    Last edited by Turtleflipper; April 22nd, 2007 at 06:35 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  8. #8
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    Quote Originally Posted by Turtleflipper
    I would like to see how this in any way colloberates the reliability theorm however!
    Now here, I'm really making things up, so take this with a (large) grain of salt:

    Reliability theory is basically that humans (and other living organisms) can essentially be treated as machines with regard to life expectancy, with the various biological systems similar to parts that wear down with time. Older people's mortality rates would therefore be less affected by quality of life (or whatever you want to use to identify differences between societies), because their "parts" are already worn down; it doesn't matter how well you treat them. Younger people, by contrast, are more sensitive to how well they're treated because their "parts" are in good condition (but if mistreated could malfunction very quickly).
    Freedom is you choosing for yourself. Law is the government choosing for you. The two are opposites.

    Pray - To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf of a single petitioner confessedly unworthy - Ambrose Bierce
    Faith - Belief without evidence in what is told by one who speaks without knowledge about things without parallel - Ambrose Bierce

  9. #9
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    Re: I don't understand :cry:

    Quote Originally Posted by Castle View Post
    Now here, I'm really making things up, so take this with a (large) grain of salt:

    Reliability theory is basically that humans (and other living organisms) can essentially be treated as machines with regard to life expectancy, with the various biological systems similar to parts that wear down with time. Older people's mortality rates would therefore be less affected by quality of life (or whatever you want to use to identify differences between societies), because their "parts" are already worn down; it doesn't matter how well you treat them. Younger people, by contrast, are more sensitive to how well they're treated because their "parts" are in good condition (but if mistreated could malfunction very quickly).
    This assumes a uniformity of wear.
    Surely pseudo-nomadic tribesmen who marathon-kill gazelles are going to endure far more damage over a similiar period of time compared to a more sedentary westerner.
    Further more, why do we assume comparative levels of start-system damage? Again, a child who experiences numerous plagues, famines, and droughts would start with far more internal organ damage then plump and juicy peers in other parts of the world.

    I personally think it has more to do with sociology then mechanics (to throw my opinion out in the open!)

 

 

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